Impact of nurse agreeableness and negative mood of nursing supervisors on intention to help colleagues

Authors


C.-I. Teng: e-mail: chingit@mail.cgu.edu.tw

Abstract

chang h.-y., teng c.-i., chu t.-l., chang h.-t. & hsu w.-h. (2012) Impact of nurse agreeableness and negative mood of nursing supervisors on intention to help colleagues. Journal of Advanced Nursing68(3), 636–646.

Abstract

Aims.  This paper is a report of a correlational study of the relations of nurse agreeableness and negative supervisor mood to nurses’ intentions to help their colleagues.

Background.  Nursing collaboration is important to high quality care. Previous studies have identified agreeableness and negative mood of supervisors as influential factors in the workplace. In nursing, however, exactly how these factors and their interactions influence nurses’ intention to help their colleagues remains unknown.

Methods.  A cross-sectional design and questionnaires were used to collect data in December 2007. Each sample set comprised of one supervisor and three nurses. A total of 53 sets of questionnaires were distributed, and 46 complete sets of responses were received, yielding a response ratio of 86·8%.

Results.  The analytical results indicate that nurse agreeableness is positively related to nurses’ intentions to help colleagues (path coefficient = 0·54, < 0·01). However, negative supervisor mood is negatively related to nurses’ intentions to help colleagues (path coefficient = −0·13, < 0·05). Moreover, the analytical results indicated that for highly agreeable nurses, the relationship between negative supervisor mood and nurses’ intentions to help colleagues is significantly stronger than for less agreeable nurses. This demonstrates that nurse agreeableness amplifies the negative impact of negative supervisor mood on nurses’ intentions to help colleagues.

Conclusion.  The study findings suggest the pivotal importance of managing negative supervisor mood to increase nurses’ intentions to help colleagues.

Ancillary