The effectiveness of the Omaha System intervention on the women’s health promotion lifestyle profile and quality of life

Authors


B. Erci: e-mail: behiceerci@hotmail.com

Abstract

erci b.(2011) The effectiveness of the Omaha System intervention on the women’s health promotion lifestyle profile and quality of life. Journal of Advanced Nursing 68(4), 898–907.

Abstract

Aim.  This article is a report of a quasi-experimental study of the effectiveness of the Omaha System intervention on the women’s health promotion lifestyle profile and the quality of life.

Background.  The Omaha System is a model for organizing, documenting and evaluating the outcomes of comprehensive, community-based, client-centred care. Therefore, the Omaha System is important for public health nurses whose aim is to protect and promote health. However, few studies addressed the influence of the Omaha System on health promotion activities or quality of life in adult population.

Methods.  The design of the study was one-group pre-test and post-test. The study took place in Turkey in 2007; the sample comprised 76 women from an urban primary healthcare centre. The women completed questionnaires consisting of demographical characteristics, the health promotion lifestyle profile scale developed by Walker and colleagues and the quality of life scale developed by Burckhardt and colleagues. The researcher then visited selected women in their home weekly or biweekly for a 4-month period. At the end of intervention, the scales were applied to the women as the post-test.

Findings.  The mean scores of self-actualization, health responsibility, interpersonal support, stress management subscales of the health promotion lifestyle profile and the total score increased in post-test, except for nutrition subscale. There were statistically significant differences between pre- and post-test scores.

Conclusions.  This study demonstrated that the Omaha System intervention increases health promotion lifestyle profile of the women. It is recommended as a nursing care to health promotion.

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