SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Keywords:

  • breast neoplasms;
  • breast self-examination;
  • cancer survivors;
  • health education;
  • nursing;
  • prevention & control;
  • self-efficacy

yi m. & park e.y. (2011) Effects of breast health education conducted by trained breast cancer survivors. Journal of Advanced Nursing 68(5), 1100–1110.

Abstract

Aims.  This article is a report on a study of the effectiveness of breast health education provided by trained breast cancer survivors on knowledge, skills, performance and self-efficacy.

Background.  Numerous studies have been performed to assess the effects of breast health education provided by health professionals, but few studies have examined the effects of education provided by lay persons, such as breast cancer survivors. This study focused on the role of breast cancer survivors as breast health educators.

Methods.  A pretest and post-test quasi-experimental design was used. Trained breast cancer survivors conducted a 60-minute breast health class that was guided by self-efficacy theory to young healthy women. The data were collected in 2008 from 22 young healthy women who participated in the class. Self-report questionnaires were used to measure the breast cancer and breast self-examinations knowledge, skills, performance and self-efficacy at pre-education, and at 1 month and 3 months post-education.

Results.  The scores on knowledge, skills, performance and self-efficacy before breast health education were significantly increased after 1 month and 3 months post-education.

Conclusion.  The results of this study demonstrate that a one-time breast health class provided by trained breast cancer survivors can be useful in motivating young women to adopt behaviours that help to prevent breast cancer morbidity and mortality.