Home healthcare nurse retention and patient outcome model: discussion and model development

Authors

  • Carol Hall Ellenbecker,

    1. Carol Hall Ellenbecker PhD RN Professor College of Nursing and Health Sciences University of Massachusetts Boston Massachusetts, USA
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  • Margaret Cushman

    1. Margaret Cushman PhD RN FAAN Assistant Professor School of Nursing The Pennsylvania State University, 307E Health and Human Development East, State College, Pennsylvania, USA
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C.H. Ellenbecker:
e-mail: carol.ellenbecker@umb.edu

Abstract

ellenbecker c.h. & cushman m. (2011) Home healthcare nurse retention and patient outcome model: discussion and model development. Journal of Advanced Nursing68(6), 1881–1893.

Abstract

Aim.  This paper discusses additions to an empirically tested model of home healthcare nurse retention. An argument is made that the variables of shared decision-making and organizational commitment be added to the model based on the authors’ previous research and additional evidence from the literature.

Background.  Previous research testing the home healthcare nurse retention model established empirical relationships between nurse, agency, and area characteristics to nurse job satisfaction, intent to stay, and retention. Unexplained model variance prompted a new literature search to augment understanding of nurse retention and patient and agency outcomes.

Data sources.  Data come from the authors’ previous research, and a literature search from 1990 to 2011 on the topics organizational commitment, shared decision-making, nurse retention, patient outcomes and agency performance.

Discussion.  The literature provides a rationale for the additional variables of shared decision-making and affective and continuous organizational commitment, linking these variables to nurse job satisfaction, nurse intent to stay, nurse retention and patient outcomes and agency performance.

Implications for nursing.  The new variables in the model suggest that all agencies, even those not struggling to retain nurses, should develop interventions to enhance nurse job satisfaction to assure quality patient outcomes.

Conclusion.  The new nurse retention and patient outcome model increases our understanding of nurse retention. An understanding of the relationship among these variables will guide future research and the development of interventions to create and maintain nursing work environments that contribute to nurse affective agency commitment, nurse retention and quality of patient outcomes.

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