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Chronic kidney disease stressors influence choice of dialysis modality

Authors

  • Lori Harwood,

    1. Lori Harwood MSc RN (EC) Nurse Practitioner/Advanced Practice Nurse London Health Sciences Centre, Adjunct Assistant Professor University of Western Ontario, and Doctoral Student, University of Alberta, Canada
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  • Barbara Wilson,

    1. Barbara Wilson MScN RN (EC) Nurse Practitioner/Advanced Practice Nurse London Health Sciences Centre, and Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Western Ontario, Canada
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  • Jessica Sontrop,

    1. Jessica Sontrop PhD Epidemiologist Kidney Clinical Research Unit, London Health Sciences Centre, and Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, Canada
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  • Alexander M. Clark

    1. Alexander M. Clark BA PhD RN Professor, Associate Dean Research, Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Canada
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L. Harwood:
e-mail: lori.harwood@lhsc.on.ca

Abstract

harwood l., wilson b., sontrop j. & clark a.m. (2012) Chronic kidney disease stressors influence choice of dialysis modality. Journal of Advanced Nursing68(11), 2454–2465.

Abstract

Aim.  This article is a report of a study examining the relationships between chronic kidney disease stressors and coping strategies with dialysis modality.

Background.  People with chronic kidney disease are given information to enable dialysis modality choice. This education increases awareness and may alleviate concerns and stress. Disease-related stressors and coping may affect dialysis selection. Understanding the influence of stress and coping on dialysis choices will assist in providing responsive programmes. Reducing stress and encouraging coping may increase home dialysis which, despite economic and patient benefits, remains underused.

Design.  A prospective correlational design was used.

Methods.  Information was obtained from the Chronic Kidney Disease Stress Inventory and the Jalowiec Coping Scale in 223 individuals not on dialysis between the years 2005–2007. Data were recorded with respect to modality at dialysis initiation (n = 76) from 2005–2010. The effects of stress, coping and patient parameters on modality selection were compared using bivariate and multivariate analyses.

Results.  Individuals on home dialysis vs. in-centre haemodialysis reported significantly fewer pre-dialysis stressors. Coping was not associated with dialysis modality. Individuals on in-centre haemodialysis had a lower serum creatinine, less advanced kidney disease and weighed more than those who started on a home therapy. Physiological stressors were most common and are amenable to interventions.

Conclusion.  Pre-dialysis stress levels predicted dialysis modality. Interventional studies are recommended to address chronic kidney disease stressors with the outcome of improving home-dialysis usage.

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