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The influence of organizational characteristics on employee solidarity in the long-term care sector

Authors

  • Jane M. Cramm,

    1. Jane M. Cramm PhD Senior Researcher Institute of Health Policy & Management (iBMG), Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
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  • Mathilde M.H. Strating,

    1. Mathilde M.H. Strating PhD Assistant Professor Institute of Health Policy & Management (iBMG), Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
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  • Anna P. Nieboer

    1. Anna P. Nieboer PhD Associate Professor Institute of Health Policy & Management (iBMG), Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
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J.M. Cramm: e-mail: cramm@bmg.eur.nl

Abstract

cramm j.m., strating m.m.h. & nieboer a.p. (2013) The influence of organizational characteristics on employee solidarity in the long-term care sector. Journal of Advanced Nursing69(3), 526–534. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2012.06027.x

Abstract

Aim.  This article is a report of a study that identifies organizational characteristics explaining employee solidarity in the long-term care sector.

Background.  Employee solidarity reportedly improves organizations’ effectiveness and efficiency. Although general research on solidarity in organizations is available, the impact of the organizational context on solidarity in long-term care settings is lacking.

Design.  Cross-sectional survey.

Method.  The study was carried out in Dutch long-term care. A total of 313 nurses, managers and other care professionals in 23 organizations were involved. Organizational characteristics studied were centralization, hierarchical culture, formal and informal exchange of information and leadership style. The study was carried out in 2009.

Findings.  All organizational characteristics significantly correlated with employee solidarity in the univariate analyses. In the multivariate analyses hierarchical culture, centralization, exchange of formal and informal information and transformational leadership appears to be important for solidarity among nurses, managers and other professionals in long-term care organizations, but not transactional and passive leadership styles.

Conclusion.  The study increased our knowledge of solidarity among nurses, managers and other professionals in the long-term care settings. Organizational characteristics that enhance solidarity are high levels of formal and informal information exchange, less hierarchical authority, decentralization and transformational leadership styles.

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