A critique of the National League for Nursing/Jeffries simulation framework

Authors


C.M. LaFond: e-mail: clafon2@uic.edu

Abstract

lafond c.m. & van hulle vincent c. (2012) A critique of the National League for Nursing/Jeffries simulation framework. Journal of Advanced Nursing00(0), 000–000. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2648.2012.06048.x

Abstract

Aims.  To present a critique of the National League for Nursing/Jeffries simulation framework.

Design.  Fawcett’s criteria for theory analysis and evaluation are used.

Background.  Use of simulated learning experiences in nursing education is widespread; a sound framework to guide educators across the globe in implementing these experiences effectively is essential. The basic assertion of the National League for Nursing/Jeffries simulation framework is that student-learning outcomes are influenced by the concepts of teacher, student, educational practices, and simulation design characteristics.

Data sources.  A literature search was performed using Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PubMed and Google Scholar to identify studies published in the English language, between 2005–June 2011, where the National League for Nursing/Jeffries simulation framework was tested or used as a theoretical framework for research.

Discussion.  Sixteen publications (two articles in press) from the USA and UK were identified using the framework to guide research; outcomes included increased student satisfaction, confidence, and improved skill performance.

Implications for nursing.  As a newer theoretical framework, the National League for Nursing/Jeffries simulation framework offers promise to guide the construction and implementation of simulation experiences resulting in positive student outcomes.

Conclusion.  Empirically supported definitions of concepts would strengthen the framework and help educators to consistently produce and identify positive outcomes. Additional rigorous research is necessary to further test relationships among concepts and the associated concept variables in the framework. More studies outside of the United States are needed to confirm the framework is relevant to nursing programs in other countries.

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