Temporal and spatial development of red deer harvesting in Europe: biological and cultural factors

Authors

  • JOS M. MILNER,

    1. Hedmark University College, Department Forestry and Wildlife Management, Evenstad, N-2480 Koppang, Norway;
    2. Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department Biology, University of Oslo, PO Box 1066 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway;
    Search for more papers by this author
  • CHRISTOPHE BONENFANT,

    1. Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department Biology, University of Oslo, PO Box 1066 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway;
    2. Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 43, Bvd du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France; and
    Search for more papers by this author
  • ATLE MYSTERUD,

    1. Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department Biology, University of Oslo, PO Box 1066 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway;
    Search for more papers by this author
  • JEAN-MICHEL GAILLARD,

    1. Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 43, Bvd du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France; and
    Search for more papers by this author
  • SÁNDOR CSÁNYI,

    1. St Stephen University, Department Wildlife Biology and Management, H-2103 Gödöllõ, Hungary
    Search for more papers by this author
  • NILS CHR. STENSETH

    1. Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis, Department Biology, University of Oslo, PO Box 1066 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway;
    Search for more papers by this author

Jos Milner, Hedmark University College, Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Evenstad, N-2480 Koppang, Norway (fax 0047 62430851; e-mail jos.milner@hihm.no).

Summary

  • 1Deer numbers have increased dramatically throughout Europe and North America over the last century, but empirical analyses of variation in harvesting and the influence of biological and cultural factors are lacking.
  • 2We examined trends in size and composition of red deer Cervus elaphus harvests over the last three to four decades in 11 European countries with contrasting deer productivity, management strategies and hunting traditions.
  • 3The harvest increased exponentially in all countries except Austria and Germany, where it was stable, and Poland, where it has declined in recent years. Harvest growth rates ranged from 0·009 in Austria to 0·075 in Sweden and depended on the management system and harvest composition, being negatively related to the proportion of females in the adult harvest.
  • 4Within four focal countries (France, Hungary, Norway and Scotland), there was considerable spatial variation in harvest growth rates. These tended to be higher in recently colonized areas than in traditional hunting areas and were often higher than the maximum possible population growth rate. Range expansion was an important component of the increase in total harvest in France and Scotland, but not in Hungary or Norway.
  • 5Harvest composition was available for seven countries, all of which showed a strong increase in the proportion of calves in the harvest. The sex ratio of the adult harvest was relatively stable, being strongly male-biased in Norway and marginally female-biased elsewhere. The proportion of males in the harvest was unrelated to trophy hunting objectives.
  • 6Synthesis and applications. Our study emphasizes that cultural aspects of management need to be accounted for, as well as biological factors, when interpreting the patterns of harvest growth and composition across Europe. Widespread sustained harvest growth has occurred, suggesting continued growth of deer populations with consequent social and economic impacts. Population control is therefore a major challenge for the future, currently hampered by inadequate population data and a decreasing number of hunters in some countries. Increasing the motivation of hunters to harvest female deer is one possible solution, although this may conflict with hunting traditions and economic considerations in some areas.

Ancillary