SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • Bergman, D.L., Chandler, M.D. & Locklear, A. (2000) The economic impacts of invasive species to wildlife services’ cooperators. Human Conflicts with Wildlife: Economic Considerations. Proceedings of the Third National Wildlife Research Center Special Symposium (eds L.Clark, J.Hone, A.Shivik, R.A.Watkins, K.C.Vercauteren & J.K.Yoder), pp. 169178. USDA/APHIS/WS, National Wildlife Research Center, Fort Collins, CO, USA.
  • Blackburn, T.M. & Duncan, R.P. (2001a) Determinants of establishment success in introduced birds. Nature, 414, 195197.
  • Blackburn, T.M. & Duncan, R.P. (2001b) Establishment patterns of exotic birds are constrained by non-random patterns in introduction. Journal of Biogeography, 28, 927939.
  • Bomford, M. (2003) Risk Assessment for the Import and Keeping of Exotic Vertebrates in Australia. Bureau of Rural Science, Canberra.
  • Brown, J.H. (1989) Patterns, modes and extents of invasions by vertebrates. Biological Invasions: A Global Perspective (eds J.A.Drake, H.A.Mooney, F.Di Castri, R.H.Groves, F.J.Kruger, M.Rejmanek & M.Williamson), pp. 85109, Wiley, UK.
  • Caley, P. & Kuhnert, P.M. (2006) Application and evaluation of classification trees for screening unwanted plants. Austral Ecology, 31, 647655.
  • Cassey, P. (2001a) Are there body size implications for the success of globally introduced land birds? Ecography, 24, 413420.
  • Cassey, P. (2001b) Determining variation in the success of New Zealand land birds. Global Ecology & Biogeography, 10, 161172.
  • Cassey, P. (2002a) Comparative analyses of establishment among introduced land bird. PhD thesis, Griffin University, Queensland, Australia.
  • Cassey, P. (2002b) Life history and ecology influences establishment success in introduced land birds. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 76, 465480.
  • Cassey, P. (2003) A comparative analysis of the relative success of introduced land birds on islands. Evolutionary Ecology Research, 5, 111.
  • Cassey, P., Blackburn, T.M., Sol, D., Duncan, R.P. & Lockwood, J.L. (2004) Global patterns of introduction effort and establishment success in birds. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, Series B, Biological Science (Suppl.), 271, S405S408.
  • Clark, L.A. & Pregibon, D. (1992) Tree based models. Statistical models in S (eds J.M.Chambers & T.J.Hastie), pp. 377420. Wadsworth & Brooks/Cole Advanced Books and Software, Pacific Grove, CA.
  • Cox, C.B. (2001) The geographical regions reconsidered. Journal of Biogeography, 28, 927939.
  • Crawley, M.J. (2002) Statistical Computing. An Introduction to Data Analysis using S-Plus. John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester, UK.
  • De’ath, G. & Fabricius, K.E. (2000) Classification and regression trees: a powerful yet simple technique for ecological data analysis. Ecology, 81, 31783192.
  • Duncan, R.P., Bomford, M., Forsyth, D.M. & Coniber, L. (2001) High predictability in introduction outcomes and the geographical range size of introduced Australian birds: a role for climate. Journal of Animal Ecology, 70, 621632.
  • Duncan, R.P., Blackburn, T.M. & Sol, D. (2003) The ecology of bird introductions. Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution and Systematics, 34, 7198.
  • Ehrlich, P.R. (1989) Attributes of invaders and invading processes: vertebrates. Biological Invasions: A Global Perspective (eds J.A.Drake, H.A.Mooney, F.Di Castri, R.H.Groves, F.J.Kruger, M.Rejmanek & M.Williamson), pp. 315328, Wiley, UK.
  • Fagerstone, K.A. (2003) Mitigating impacts of terrestrial invasive species. Encyclopedia of Pest Management, Vol. II (ed. D.Pimentel), pp 347352, CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Group, London.
  • Forsyth, D.M. & Duncan, R.P. (2001) Propagule size and the relative success of exotic ungulate and bird introduction to New Zealand. The American Naturalist, 157, 583595.
  • Green, R.E. (1997) The influence of numbers released on the outcome of attempts to introduce exotic bird species to New Zealand. Journal of Animal Ecology, 66, 2535.
  • Hulme, P.E., Bacher, S., Kenis, M., Klotz, S., Kuhn, I., Minchin, D., Nentwig, W., Olenin, S., Panov, V., Pergl, J., Pysĕk, P., Roques, A., Sol, D., Solarz, W. & Vilà, M. (2008) Grasping at the routes of biological invasions: a framework for integrating pathways into policy. Journal of Applied Ecology, 45, 403414.
  • Jeschke, J.M. & Strayer, D.L. (2006) Determinants of vertebrate invasion success in Europe and North America. Global Change Biology, 12, 16081619.
  • Keller, R.P., Lodge, D.M. & Finnoff, D.C. (2007) Risk assessment for invasive species produces bioeconomic benefits. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 104, 203207.
  • Kolar, C.S. & Lodge, D.M. (2001) Progress in invasion biology: predicting invaders. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 164, 199204.
  • Kolar, C.S. & Lodge, D.M. (2002) Ecological predictions and risk assessment for alien fishes in North America. Science, 298, 12331236.
  • Kramer, M. (2005). R2 Statistics for Mixed Models. Presented at the 17th Annual Kansas University Conference on Applied Statistics in Agriculture, Manhattan, KS.
  • Leung, B., Finnoff, D., Shogren, J.F. & Lodge, D. (2005) Managing invasive species: Rules of thumb for rapid assessment. Ecological Economics, 55, 2436.
  • Lever, C. (1987) Naturalised Birds of the World. Longman Sc & Tech, UK.
  • Lever, C.. (2005) Naturalised Birds of the World. T & AD Poyser, London.
  • Liker, A. & Székely, T. (2005) Mortality costs of sexual selection and parental care in natural populations of birds. Evolution, 59, 890897.
  • Littell, R.C., Milliken, G.A., Stroup, W.W. & Wolfinger, R.D. (1996) SAS System for Mixed Models. SAS Inst. Inc., Cary, NC, USA.
  • Lockwood, J.L., Cassey, P. & Blackburn, T.M. (2005) The role of propagule pressure in explaining species invasions. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 20, 223225.
  • Long, J.L. (1981) Introduced Birds of the World. David and Charles, London.
  • Mayr, E. (1965) The nature of colonizing birds. The Genetics of Colonizing Species (eds H.G.Baker & G.L.Stebbins), pp 2943, Academic Press, New York.
  • McLain, D.K., Moulton, M.P. & Sanderson, J.G. (1999) Sexual selection and extinction: The fate of plumage-dimorphic and plumage-monomorphic birds introduced onto islands. Evolutionary Ecology Research, 1, 549565.
  • Moulton, M.P. & Pimm, S.L. (1986) Species introductions to Hawaii. Ecology of Biological Invasions in North America and Hawaii (eds J.A.Drake & H.A.Mooney), pp. 231249. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York.
  • Newsome, A.E. & Noble, I.R. (1986) Ecological and physiological characters of invading species. Ecological Invasions of North America and Hawaii (eds R.H.Groves & J.J.Burdon), pp. 120. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
  • Nice, M.M. (1962) Development of behavior in precocial birds. Transactions of the Linnaean Society of New York, 8, 1211.
  • Pheloung, P.C., Williams, P.A. & Halloy, S.R. (1999) A weed risk assessment model for use as biosecurity tool evaluating plant introductions. Journal of Environmental Ecology, 57, 239251.
  • R Development Core Team (2005) R: A Language and Environment for Statistical Computing. R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria. http://www.r-project.org [a software package].
  • Reed, J.M. (1999) The role of the behavior in recent avian extinctions and endangerments. Conservation Biology, 13, 232241.
  • SAS Institute Inc. (200203) SAS/STAT Software: The GLIMMIX Procedure, Release 9.1 (TS1M3). SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC, USA.
  • Sax, D.F. & Brown, J.H. (2000) The paradox of invasion. Global Ecology & Biogeography, 9, 363371.
  • Smith, C.S., Lonsdale, W.M. & Fortune, J. (1999) When to ignore advice: predictions and decisions theory. Biological Invasions, 1, 8996.
  • Sol, D. (2007) Do successful invaders exist? Pre-adaptations to novel environments in terrestrial vertebrates. Biological invasions (ed. W.Nentwig), pp 127141, Springer, Heidelberg.
  • Sol, D. & Lefebvre, L. (2000) Behavioural flexibility predicts invasion success in birds introduced to New Zealand. Oikos, 90, 599605.
  • Sol, D., Timmermans, S. & Lefebvre, L. (2002) Behavioural flexibility and invasion success in birds. Animal Behaviour, 63, 495502.
  • Sol, D., Duncan, R.P., Blackburn, T.M., Cassey, P. & Lefebvre, L. (2005) Big brains, enhanced cognition, and responses of birds to novel environments. Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 102, 54605465.
  • Sol, D., Vilà, M. & Kühn, I. (2008a) The comparative analysis of historical alien introductions. Biological Invasions, 10, 11191129.
  • Sorci, G., Moller, A.P. & Clobert, J. (1998) Plumage dichromatism of birds predict introduction success in New Zealand. Journal of Animal Ecology, 67, 263269.
  • Therneau, T.M., Atkinson, B., Ripley, B., Oksanen, J. & Dea’th, G. (2007) mvpart: Multivariate Partitioning. R package version 1.2-6. http://cran.rproject.org/web/packages/mvpart/index.html [a library for software].
  • Thompson, G.M. (1922) The Naturalisation Animals and Plants in New Zealand. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
  • Veltman, C.J., Nee, S. & Crawley, M.J. (1996) Correlates of introduction success in exotic New Zealand birds. The American Naturalist, 147, 542557.
  • Williamson, M. (1996) Biological Invasions. Chapman & Hall, London.
  • World Trade Organization (2005) Sanitary and Phytosanitary Agreement. World Trade Organization, Geneva.