Engineering a future for amphibians under climate change

Authors

  • Luke P. Shoo,

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University of North Queensland, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Deanna H. Olson,

    1. US Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, 3200 SW Jefferson Way, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sarah K. McMenamin,

    1. Department of Biology, University of Washington, Kincaid Hall, Box 351800, Seattle, WA 98195-1800, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kris A. Murray,

    1. School of Integrative Biology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane 4072, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Monique Van Sluys,

    1. Departamento de Ecologia, IBRAG, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro. Rua São Francisco Xavier 524, CEP 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil
    2. Environmental Futures Centre, School of Environment, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Queensland, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Maureen A. Donnelly,

    1. College of Arts and Sciences and Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Danial Stratford,

    1. Environmental Futures Centre, School of Environment, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Queensland, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Juhani Terhivuo,

    1. Finnish Museum of Natural History/Zoological Museum, PO Box 17 (P. Rautatiekatu 13), FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Andres Merino-Viteri,

    1. Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University of North Queensland, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    2. Museo de Zoología, Escuela de Biología, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador, Av. 12 de Octubre 1076 y Roca, Aptdo 17-01-2184, Quito, Ecuador
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sarah M. Herbert,

    1. EcoGecko Consultants, 212 Pembroke Rd, Wilton, Wellington 6012
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Phillip J. Bishop,

    1. Department of Zoology, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Paul Stephen Corn,

    1. US Geological Survey, Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Inst., 790 E. Beckwith Ave., Missoula, MT 59801, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Liz Dovey,

    1. Department of Climate Change, GPO Box 854, Canberra ACT 2600, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Richard A. Griffiths,

    1. The Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology, School of Anthropology and Conservation, Marlowe Building, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NR, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Katrin Lowe,

    1. Environmental Futures Centre, School of Environment, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Queensland, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Michael Mahony,

    1. Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle 2308, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Hamish McCallum,

    1. Environmental Futures Centre, School of Environment, Griffith University, Nathan Campus, Queensland, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jonathan D. Shuker,

    1. Environmental Futures Centre, School of Environment, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Queensland, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Clay Simpkins,

    1. Environmental Futures Centre, School of Environment, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Queensland, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lee F. Skerratt,

    1. School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Sciences, Amphibian Disease Ecology Group, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Stephen E. Williams,

    1. Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University of North Queensland, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jean-Marc Hero

    1. Environmental Futures Centre, School of Environment, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Queensland, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

Correspondence author. School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia. E-mail: l.shoo@uq.edu.au

Summary

1. Altered global climates in the 21st century pose serious threats for biological systems and practical actions are needed to mount a response for species at risk.

2. We identify management actions from across the world and from diverse disciplines that are applicable to minimizing loss of amphibian biodiversity under climate change. Actions were grouped under three thematic areas of intervention: (i) installation of microclimate and microhabitat refuges; (ii) enhancement and restoration of breeding sites; and (iii) manipulation of hydroperiod or water levels at breeding sites.

3.Synthesis and applications. There are currently few meaningful management actions that will tangibly impact the pervasive threat of climate change on amphibians. A host of potentially useful but poorly tested actions could be incorporated into local or regional management plans, programmes and activities for amphibians. Examples include: installation of irrigation sprayers to manipulate water potentials at breeding sites; retention or supplementation of natural and artificial shelters (e.g. logs, cover boards) to reduce desiccation and thermal stress; manipulation of canopy cover over ponds to reduce water temperature; and, creation of hydrologoically diverse wetland habitats capable of supporting larval development under variable rainfall regimes. We encourage researchers and managers to design, test and scale up new initiatives to respond to this emerging crisis.

Ancillary