SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • Anderson, R.P., Lew, D. & Peterson, A.T. (2003) Evaluating predictive models of species’ distributions: criteria for selecting optimal models. Ecological Modelling, 162, 211232.
  • Araújo, M.B. & Guisan, A. (2006) Five (or so) challenges for species distribution modelling. Journal of Biogeography, 33, 16771688.
  • Araújo, M.B. & Pearson, R.G. (2005) Equilibrium of species’ distributions with climate. Ecography, 28, 693695.
  • Araújo, M.B., Pearson, R.G., Thuiller, W. & Erhard, M. (2005) Validation of species–climate impact models under climate change. Global Change Biology, 11, 15041513.
  • Austin, M.P. (2002) Spatial prediction of species distribution: an interface between ecological theory and statistical modelling. Ecological Modelling, 157, 101118.
  • Austin, M.P. (2007) Species distribution models and ecological theory: a critical assessment and some possible new approaches. Ecological Modelling, 200, 119.
  • Barry, S.C. & Elith, J. (2006) Error and uncertainty in habitat models. Journal of Applied Ecology, 43, 413423.
  • Beaumont, L.J., Hughes, L. & Poulsen, M. (2005) Predicting species distributions: use of climatic parameters in BIOCLIM and its impact on predictions of species’ current and future distributions. Ecological Modelling, 186, 250269.
  • Bernstein, C.M., Krebs, J.R. & Kacelnik, A. (1991) Distribution of birds amongst habitats: theory and relevance to conservation. Bird population studies: relevance to conservation and management (ed. by C.M. Perrins, J.D. Lebreton and G.J.M. Hirons), pp. 317345. Oxford University Press, Oxford.
  • Biew, M., Boehme, L., Guinet, C. et al. (2007) Variations in behavior and condition of a Southern Ocean top predator in relation to in situ oceanographic conditions. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 104, 1370513710.
  • Bugmann, H. (2001) A review of forest gap models. Climatic Change, 51, 259305.
  • Cade, B.S., Noon, B.R. & Flather, C.H. (2005) Quantile regression reveals hidden bias and uncertainty in habitat models. Ecology, 86, 786800.
  • Cassini, M.H., Fasola, L., Chéhebar, C. & Macdonald, D.W. (2009) Scale-dependent analysis of an otter–crustacean system in Argentinean Patagonia. Naturwissenschaften, 96, 593599.
  • Charnov, E.L. (1976) Optimal foraging, the marginal value theorem. Theoretical Population Biology, 9, 129136.
  • Chase, J.M. & Leibold, M.A. (2003) Ecological niches: linking classical and contemporary approaches. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago.
  • Chuine, I. & Beaubien, E. (2001) Phenology is a major determinant of temperate tree range. Ecology Letters, 4, 500510.
  • Dias, P.C. (1996) Source and sinks in population biology. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 11, 326330.
  • Dullinger, S., Dirnböck, T. & Grabherr, G. (2004) Modelling climate change-driven treeline shifts: relative effects of temperature increase, dispersal and invasibility. Journal of Ecology, 92, 241252.
  • Elith, J. & Leathwick, J.R. (2009) Species distribution models: ecological explanation and prediction across space and time. Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics, 40, 677697.
  • Elith, J., Graham, C.H., Anderson, R.P. et al. (2006) Novel methods improve prediction of species’ distributions from occurrence data. Ecography, 29, 129151.
  • Fretwell, S.D. & Lucas, H.L., Jr (1970) On territorial behaviour and other factors influencing habitat distribution in birds. I. Theoretical development. Acta Biotheorologica, 19, 1636.
  • Garshelis, D.L. (2000) Delusions in habitat evaluation: measuring use, selection, and importance. Research techniques in animal ecology: controversies and consequences (ed. by L. Boitani and T.K. Fuller), pp. 111164. Columbia University Press, New York.
  • Gelfand, A.E., Schmidt, A.M., Wu, S., Silander, J.A., Latimer, A. & Rebelo, A.G. (2005) Modelling species diversity through species level hierarchical modelling. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series C, 54, 120.
  • Gibson, L.A., Wilson, B.A., Cahill, D.M. & Hill, J. (2004) Spatial prediction of rufous bristlebird habitat in a coastal heathland: a GIS-based approach. Journal of Applied Ecology, 41, 213223.
  • Guisan, A. & Thuiller, W. (2005) Predicting species distribution: offering more than simple habitat models. Ecology Letters, 8, 9931009.
  • Guisan, A. & Zimmermann, N.E. (2000) Predictive habitat distribution models in ecology. Ecological Modelling, 135, 147186.
  • Guisan, A., Graham, C.H., Elith, J. & Huettmann, F. (2007) Sensitivity of predictive species distribution models to change in grain size. Diversity and Distributions, 13, 332340.
  • Heikkinen, R., Luoto, M., Aráujo, M.B., Virkkala, R., Thuiller, W. & Sykes, M.T. (2006) Methods and uncertainties in bioclimatic envelope modelling under climate change. Progress in Physical Geography, 30, 751777.
  • Herrnstein, R.J. (1961) Relative and absolute strength of responses as a function of frequency of reinforcement. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behaviour, 4, 267272.
  • Hirzel, A.H., Hausser, J., Chessel, D. & Perrin, N. (2002) Ecological-niche factor analysis: how to compute habitat suitability maps without absence data? Ecology, 83, 20272036.
  • Hutchinson, G.E. (1957) Concluding remarks. Cold Spring Harbour Symposium on Quantitative Biology, 22, 415427.
  • Jiménez-Valverde, A. & Lobo, J.M. (2006) The ghost of unbalanced species distribution data in geographic model predictions. Diversity and Distributions, 12, 521524.
  • Jiménez-Valverde, A., Lobo, J.M. & Hortal, J. (2008) Not as good as they seem: the importance of concepts in species distribution modelling. Diversity and Distributions, 14, 885890.
  • Johnson, C. (2008) Sensitivity of species-distribution models to error, bias, and model design: an application to resource selection functions for woodland caribou. Ecological Modelling, 213, 143155.
  • Kearney, M. & Porter, W.P. (2009) Mechanistic niche modeling: combining physiological and spatial data to predict species’ ranges. Ecology Letters, 12, 334350.
  • Kery, M., Gardner, B. & Monnerat, C. (2010) Predicting species distributions from checklist data using site-occupancy models. Journal of Biogeography, 37, 18511862.
  • Krebs, C.J. (1972) Ecology: the experimental analysis of distribution and abundance. The University of British Columbia, San Francisco, CA.
  • Krebs, J.R. & Davies, N.B. (1995) Behavioural ecology: an evolutionary approach. Blackwell, Oxford.
  • Levins, R. (1969) Some demographic and genetic consequences of environmental heterogeneity for biological control. Bulletin of the Entomological Society of America, 15, 237240.
  • Lomnicki, A. (1999) Individual-based models and the individual-based approach to individual-based model. Ecology, 83, 18171830.
  • Mac Nally, R. (2000) Regression and model-building in conservation biology, biogeography and ecology: the distinction between – and reconciliation of –‘predictive’ and ‘explanatory’ models. Biodiversity Conservation, 9, 655671.
  • Mackey, B.G. & Lindenmayer, D.B. (2001) Towards a hierarchical framework for modelling the spatial distribution of animals. Journal of Biogeography, 28, 11471166.
  • Maina, G.G., Brown, J.S. & Gersani, M. (2002) Intra-plant versus inter-plant root competition in beans: avoidance, resource matching or Tragedy of the Commons. Plant Ecology, 160, 235247.
  • McNaughton, S.J. & Wolf, L.L. (1979) General ecology, 2nd edn. Holt, Rinehart & Winston, New York.
  • Menke, S.D., Holway, D.A., Fisher, R.N. & Jetz, W. (2009) Characterizing and predicting species distributions across environments and scales: Argentine ant occurrences in the eye of the beholder. Global Ecology and Biogeography, 18, 5063.
  • Mokany, K. & Ferrier, S. (2011) Predicting impacts of climate change on biodiversity: a role for semi-mechanistic community-level modelling. Diversity and Distributions, 17, 374380.
  • Morin, X. & Lechowicz, M.J. (2008) Contemporary perspectives on the niche that can improve models of species range shifts under climate change. Biology Letters, 4, 573576.
  • Pearman, P.B., Guisan, A., Broennimann, O. & Randin, C.F. (2008) Niche dynamics in space and time. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 23, 149158.
  • Pearson, R.G., Dawson, T.E. & Liu, C. (2004) Modelling species distributions in Britain: a hierarchical integration of climate and land-cover data. Ecography, 27, 285298.
  • Peterson, A.T. (2006) Uses and requirements of ecological niche models and related distributional models. Biodiversity Informatics, 3, 5972.
  • Pianka, E.R. (1974) Evolutionary ecology. Harper & Row, New York.
  • Pulliam, H.R. (2000) On the relationship between niche and distribution. Ecology Letters, 3, 349361.
  • Pulliam, H.R. & Caraco, T. (1984) Living in groups: is there an optimal group size? Behavioural ecology: an evolutionary approach, 2nd edn (ed. by J.R. Krebs and N.B. Davies), pp. 122147. Sinauer, Sunderland, MA.
  • Railsback, S.F. & Harvey, B.C. (2002) Analysis of habitat-selection rules using an individual-based model. Ecology, 83, 18171830.
  • Railsback, S.F., Stauffer, H.B. & Harvey, B.C. (2003) What can habitat preference models tell us? Tests using a virtual trout population. Ecology, 13, 15801594.
  • Rosenzweig, M.L. (1981) A theory of habitat selection. Ecology, 62, 327335.
  • Rotenberry, J.T. (1986) Habitat relationships of shrubsteppe birds: even “good” models cannot predict the future. Wildlife 2000: modeling habitat relationships of terrestrial vertebrates (ed. by J. Verner, M.L. Morrison and C.J. Ralph), pp. 217222. University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, WI.
  • Senft, R.L. (1989) Hierarchical foraging models: effects of stocking and landscape composition on simulated resource use by cattle. Ecological Modelling, 46, 223230.
  • Silvertown, J., Dodd, M., Gowing, D., Lawson, C. & McConway, K. (2006) Phylogeny and the hierarchical organization of plant diversity. Ecology, 87, S39S49.
  • Sitch, S., Smith, B., Prentice, I.C., Arneth, A., Bondeau, A., Cramer, W., Kaplan, J.O., Levis, S., Lucht, W., Sykes, M.T., Thonike, K. & Veneski, S. (2003) Evaluation of ecosystem dynamics, plant geography and terrestrial carbon cycling in the LPJ dynamic global vegetation model. Global Change Biology, 9, 161185.
  • Slobodkin, B.L. (1953) On social single species populations. Ecology, 34, 430434.
  • Soberón, J. (1986) The relationship between use and suitability of resources and its consequences to insect population size. The American Naturalist, 127, 338357.
  • Soberón, J. (2007) Grinnellian and Eltonian niches and geographic distributions of species. Ecology Letters, 10, 11151123.
  • Soberón, J. & Peterson, A.T. (2005) Interpretation of models of fundamental ecological niches and species’ distributional areas. Biodiversity Informatics, 2, 110.
  • Staddon, J.E.R. (1983) Adaptive behaviour and learning. University of Cambridge Press, Cambridge.
  • Stephens, D.W. & Krebs, J.R. (1986) Foraging theory. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ.
  • Sutherland, W.J. (1983) Aggregation and the ‘ideal free’ distribution. Journal of Animal Ecology, 52, 821828.
  • Sutherland, W.J. (1996) From individual behaviour to population ecology. Blackwell, Oxford.
  • Sutherland, W.J. & Parker, G.A. (1985) Distributions of unequal competitors. Behavioural ecology: ecological consequences of adaptive behaviour (ed. by R.M. Sibly and R.H. Smith), pp. 225274. Blackwell, Oxford.
  • Svenning, J.-C. & Skov, F. (2004) Limited filling of the potential range in European tree species. Ecology Letters, 7, 565573.
  • Thomson, J.D., Weiblen, G., Thomson, B.A., Alfaro, S. & Legendre, P. (1996) Untangling multiple factors in spatial distributions: lilies, gophers, and rocks. Ecology, 77, 16981715.
  • Van Horne, B. (1983) Density as a misleading indicator of habitat quality. Journal of Wildlife Management, 47, 893901.
  • Wiens, J.A. (2002) Predicting species occurrences: progress, problems, and prospects. Predicting species occurrences: issues of accuracy and scale (ed. by J.M. Scott, P.J. Heglund, M.L. Morrison, J.B. Haufler, M.G. Raphael, W.A. Wall and F.B. Samson), pp. 739749. Island Press, Covelo, CA.
  • Woodroffe, R. & Ginsberg, J.R. (1998) Edge effects and the extinction of populations inside protected areas. Science, 280, 21262128.