Audit diabetes-dependent quality of life questionnaire: usefulness in diabetes self-management education in the Slovak population

Authors

  • Elena Holmanová,

    1. Authors:Elena Holmanová, MSc, RN, Assistant Lecturer, Institute of Nursing, Jesseniuss Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Martin, Slovakia; Katarína Žiaková, MSc, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, Head of Institute of Nursing, Jesseniuss Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Martin, Slovakia
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  • Katarína Žiaková

    1. Authors:Elena Holmanová, MSc, RN, Assistant Lecturer, Institute of Nursing, Jesseniuss Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Martin, Slovakia; Katarína Žiaková, MSc, PhD, RN, Associate Professor, Head of Institute of Nursing, Jesseniuss Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Martin, Slovakia
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Elena Holmanová, Assistant Lecturer, Institute of Nursing, Jesseniuss Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Malá Hora 5, 036 32 Martin, Slovakia. Telephone: 00421 43 4906730.
E-mail:holmanova@jfmed.uniba.sk

Abstract

Aim and objectives.  This paper reports a study to test validity and internal consistency of the audit diabetes-dependent quality of life questionnaire in the Slovak population and to evaluate its usefulness in the context of education of people with diabetes.

Background.  The individualised instruments designed to measure individuals’ perceptions of the impact of diabetes on their quality of life may be helpful to identify individuals’ preferences, motivational deficits in diabetes management and to tailor individual treatment strategies.

Design.  Survey.

Methods.  After linguistic validation, the structure of the questionnaire was tested using factor analysis on 104 patients who were recruited from the National Institute of Endocrinology and Diabetology in Ľubochňa. Internal consistency was evaluated by computing Cronbach’s alpha. Clinical variables related to the quality of life were analysed using one-way anova, multifactor anova, Pearson’s and Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients.

Results.  A one-dimensional scale structure was supported and internal consistency was high (α = 0·93). Variance in impact of diabetes on quality of life was explained by age, presence of late complications and type of insulin regimen.

Conclusions.  The audit diabetes-dependent quality of life is culturally appropriate, valid and reliable in the sample of Slovak patients attending the educational programme. Our results agreed with previous European and Asian studies supporting its usefulness in the context of diabetes self-management education.

Relevance to clinical practice.  Individualised diabetes-specific quality of life measures allow better understanding of patients’ treatment preferences and, consequently, more effective prioritising and targeting of appropriate educational interventions. This instrument may be useful in routine clinical practice and as an outcome measure for international clinical research trials evaluating effectiveness of educational programmes.

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