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Keywords:

  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease;
  • health promotion;
  • family caregivers/carers;
  • nurses;
  • nursing

Aims and objectives.  The aim of this study was to generate in-depth insights into patients’ and family members’ understanding of the causation, progression and prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and the role of health promotion with this population. In particular, we were interested in identifying the ways patients and family members considered that they could maximise their (patients’) health, in the presence of this disease.

Background.  Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is highly prevalent and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, impacting on quality of life and healthcare expenditure. Health promotion is, therefore, an important consideration. There are few examples in the literature of health promotion programmes for this population, including those directed at smoking cessation, which also focus on the family or significant others.

Design.  An exploratory, descriptive design was employed.

Method.  Semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews were conducted with 14 patients and 12 family caregivers. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed using content analysis procedures which captured the meaning of the data.

Results.  The three main themes were ‘health promotion: what’s that?’, ‘community resources for health promotion’ and ‘it wasn’t just the smoking’. Many participants seemed unaware that their health might benefit from a healthier life style and provided little spontaneous information on any activities they carried out to maintain or improve their health.

Conclusions.  This study highlighted a dearth of health promoting activity amongst people affected by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The reality for most patients was to manage the day-to-day demands that the symptoms of the disease imposed on them. Our data suggest that a more wide-ranging approach, encompassing aspects of health promotion, might be welcomed by many patients and their family carers.

Relevance to clinical practice.  The findings from this study highlight gaps in patients’ and carers’ understanding of the potential role of health promotion in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and areas for intervention by health professionals. With the increase in smoking rates of women and predicted future increases in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, it is imperative that health professionals find effective ways to provide support and health promotive care for patients and families.