The relationships between organisational citizenship behaviour, job satisfaction and turnover intention

Authors

  • Yafang Tsai,

    1. Authors:Yafang Tsai, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management and Consultant, Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University; Shih-Wang Wu, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Hospital and Health Care Administration, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy & Science, Tainan, Taiwan
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  • Shih-Wang Wu

    1. Authors:Yafang Tsai, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Health Policy and Management and Consultant, Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University; Shih-Wang Wu, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Hospital and Health Care Administration, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy & Science, Tainan, Taiwan
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Erratum Volume 28, Issue 5, 625, Article first published online: 12 April 2011
  2. Errata: Corrigendum Volume 20, Issue 9-10, 1504, Article first published online: 15 April 2011

Shih-Wang Wu, Assistant Professor, Department of Hospital and Health Care Administration, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy & Science, PO Box 62-13, Tainan, Tainan City 70899, Taiwan. Telephone: +886 6 2664911 ext. 5225.
E-mail:scottwu101@mail.chna.edu.tw

Abstract

Aim.  This study aims to explore the relationships between organisational citizenship behaviour, job satisfaction and turnover intention.

Background.  Because of the changing health policies landscape, Taiwan’s hospital administrators are facing major cost reduction challenges. Specifically, the high turnover rate of nurses represents a hindrance and a human resource cost. This study focuses on ways of reducing the employee turnover rate through enhanced organisational citizenship behaviour and job satisfaction.

Design.  A cross-sectional study.

Methods.  This study focuses on hospital nurses in Taiwan. Our research samples were obtained from one medical centre, three regional hospitals and seven district hospitals. Out of 300 questionnaires distributed among samples, 237 were completed and returned. Pearson’s correlation was used to test for relationships among the main variables. One-way analysis of variance and Scheffé’s post hoc analysis were employed to test the influence of demographic data on the main variables.

Results.  The results reveal that the nurses’ job satisfaction has a significantly positive correlation with organisational citizenship behaviour and a negative correlation with turnover intention.

Conclusions.  This study has proven that the turnover intention of clinical nurses is related to their organisational citizenship behaviour and job satisfaction. Hospital administrators can reduce the turnover intention by meeting nurses’ needs and by promoting their organisational citizenship behaviour.

Relevance to clinical practice.  Organisational citizenship behaviour involves behaviour that encourages staff to endeavour to voluntarily improve organisational performance without lobbying for compensation. Employees’ job satisfaction includes satisfaction with the working environment or welfare programme in the context of human resource initiatives. Similarly, human resource protocols may serve as the starting point for promoting staff organisational citizenship behaviour. Administrators in clinical healthcare are encouraged to meet their employees’ working needs through human resource practices.

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