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Intention to leave of Asian nurses in US hospitals: does cultural orientation matter?

Authors

  • Ching-Yu Cheng,

    1. Authors: Ching-Yu Cheng, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Chang Gung Institute of Technology, School of Nursing; Shwu-Ru Liou, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Chang Gung Institute of Technology, School of Nursing, Chiayi, Taiwan
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  • Shwu-Ru Liou

    1. Authors: Ching-Yu Cheng, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Chang Gung Institute of Technology, School of Nursing; Shwu-Ru Liou, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Chang Gung Institute of Technology, School of Nursing, Chiayi, Taiwan
    Search for more papers by this author

Shwu-Ru Liou, Assistant Professor, Chang Gung Institute of Technology, School of Nursing, 2 Chia-pu Rd, West Sec., Pu-tz, Chiayi 61363, Taiwan. Telephone: +886 5 3628800 ext. 2211.
E-mail:srliou5022@gmail.com

Abstract

Aim and objectives.  To measure the predictability of cultural orientation on organisational commitment, perception of practice environment and intention to leave amongst Asian nurses working in US hospitals.

Background.  To alleviate the nursing shortage, healthcare institutions have increased recruitment of nurses internationally, with Asian nurses representing the largest proportion of international nurses working in the US. Whilst organisational commitment and perception of practice environment were related to intention to leave, few studies have been done on the predictability of intention to leave amongst Asian nurses.

Design.  A cross-sectional postal survey design.

Method.  One hundred and ninety-five Asian nurses working at least six months in US hospitals completed the survey. Most participants were Filipinos or Chinese, married and worked full-time. The Organisational Commitment Questionnaire, Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index, Anticipated Turnover Scale and Collectivist Orientation Scale with satisfactory reliability were used.

Results.  Perception of practice environment was correlated with intention to leave and organisational commitment, which was correlated with intention to leave. Cultural orientation showed positive predictable effects on organisational commitment and perception of practice environment, but had negative predictability for intention to leave. The mediating effect of organisational commitment on practice environment and intention to leave was 93·98%, when cultural orientation was not controlled for. It increased slightly to 96·54% when cultural orientation was controlled for.

Conclusions.  Asian nurses who are more collectivist-oriented are more willing to accept the goals and values of the organisation, exert effort on behalf of the organisation, are more satisfied with their current practice environment and have less intention to leave their current job. Organisational commitment is a key predictor of Asian nurses’ intention to leave.

Relevance to clinical practice.  Hospital administrators can use cultural orientation as a strategy to promote organisational commitment amongst Asian nurses, thereby reducing the rate of turnover.

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