Predictors of health-related quality of life in a sample of children and adolescents: a school survey

Authors

  • Kristin Haraldstad,

    1. Authors:Kristin Haraldstad, MSc, RN, PhD Student, Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo and Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen; Knut-Andreas Christophersen, MSc, Statistician, Institute of Political Science, University of Oslo; Hilde Eide, PhD, RN, Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo; Gerd K Nativg, PhD, RN, Professor, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen; Sølvi Helseth, PhD, RN, Professor, Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo, Norway
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  • Knut-Andreas Christophersen,

    1. Authors:Kristin Haraldstad, MSc, RN, PhD Student, Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo and Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen; Knut-Andreas Christophersen, MSc, Statistician, Institute of Political Science, University of Oslo; Hilde Eide, PhD, RN, Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo; Gerd K Nativg, PhD, RN, Professor, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen; Sølvi Helseth, PhD, RN, Professor, Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo, Norway
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  • Hilde Eide,

    1. Authors:Kristin Haraldstad, MSc, RN, PhD Student, Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo and Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen; Knut-Andreas Christophersen, MSc, Statistician, Institute of Political Science, University of Oslo; Hilde Eide, PhD, RN, Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo; Gerd K Nativg, PhD, RN, Professor, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen; Sølvi Helseth, PhD, RN, Professor, Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo, Norway
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  • Gerd K Nativg,

    1. Authors:Kristin Haraldstad, MSc, RN, PhD Student, Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo and Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen; Knut-Andreas Christophersen, MSc, Statistician, Institute of Political Science, University of Oslo; Hilde Eide, PhD, RN, Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo; Gerd K Nativg, PhD, RN, Professor, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen; Sølvi Helseth, PhD, RN, Professor, Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo, Norway
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  • Sølvi Helseth

    1. Authors:Kristin Haraldstad, MSc, RN, PhD Student, Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo and Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen; Knut-Andreas Christophersen, MSc, Statistician, Institute of Political Science, University of Oslo; Hilde Eide, PhD, RN, Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo; Gerd K Nativg, PhD, RN, Professor, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen; Sølvi Helseth, PhD, RN, Professor, Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo, Norway
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Kristin Haraldstad, PhD Student, Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Pilestredet 46, N-0167 Oslo, Norway. Telephone: +47 224 537 91.
E-mail:kristin.haraldstad@su.hio.no

Abstract

Aim.  The aim is to study the health-related quality of life in a school sample of children and adolescents aged 8–18 years and to examine the relationship between health-related quality of life and the following variables; age, gender, perceived pain, body image, body mass index and bullying.

Background.  The study of health-related quality of life in children and adolescents have received little attention compared with adults in health care research and still little is known about the associations between health-related quality of life and other variables.

Design.  A cross-sectional design was chosen.

Method.  We measured the health-related quality of life using the generic questionnaire KIDSCREEN-10. We administered the KIDSCREEN 52-item, and the 10 items were selected from this according to the KIDSCREEN manual. Multilevel regression models were used to evaluate the associations between health-related quality of life and the independent variables.

Results.  The sample included 1066 children and adolescents, 576 girls and 490 boys, with a response rate of 74%. The results show that body mass index was not significant associated with health-related quality of life in full model. However, in addition to age, being bullied, pain and body image were significant associated with health-related quality of life. Of these predictors, body image has the strongest impact in terms of explained variance in health-related quality of life.

Conclusion.  The subjective sense of satisfaction or dissatisfaction with one’s body, perceived body image, is a powerful predictor of health-related quality of life.

Relevance to clinical practice.  Knowledge about predictors of health-related quality of life is especially important for public health nurses. Health promotion and intervention programmes that aim to strengthen psychosocial well-being, especially those that strengthen body image, should be developed for both genders.

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