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The effects of interpersonal counselling on health-related quality of life after myocardial infarction

Authors

  • Olli Oranta,

    1. Authors: Olli Oranta, MNSc, PhD Candidate, Department of Nursing Science and Psychiatric Clinic, University of Turku, Turku University Hospital; Sinikka Luutonen, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Psychiatric Clinic, Turku University Hospital; Raimo KR Salokangas, MSc, MD, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Psychiatric Clinic, Turku University Hospital; Tero Vahlberg, MSc, Biostatistician, University of Turku; Helena Leino-Kilpi, PhD, Professor of Nursing Science, Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Turku and Nurse Manager Hospital District of South-Western Finland, Turun yliopisto, Finland
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  • Sinikka Luutonen,

    1. Authors: Olli Oranta, MNSc, PhD Candidate, Department of Nursing Science and Psychiatric Clinic, University of Turku, Turku University Hospital; Sinikka Luutonen, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Psychiatric Clinic, Turku University Hospital; Raimo KR Salokangas, MSc, MD, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Psychiatric Clinic, Turku University Hospital; Tero Vahlberg, MSc, Biostatistician, University of Turku; Helena Leino-Kilpi, PhD, Professor of Nursing Science, Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Turku and Nurse Manager Hospital District of South-Western Finland, Turun yliopisto, Finland
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  • Raimo KR Salokangas,

    1. Authors: Olli Oranta, MNSc, PhD Candidate, Department of Nursing Science and Psychiatric Clinic, University of Turku, Turku University Hospital; Sinikka Luutonen, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Psychiatric Clinic, Turku University Hospital; Raimo KR Salokangas, MSc, MD, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Psychiatric Clinic, Turku University Hospital; Tero Vahlberg, MSc, Biostatistician, University of Turku; Helena Leino-Kilpi, PhD, Professor of Nursing Science, Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Turku and Nurse Manager Hospital District of South-Western Finland, Turun yliopisto, Finland
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  • Tero Vahlberg,

    1. Authors: Olli Oranta, MNSc, PhD Candidate, Department of Nursing Science and Psychiatric Clinic, University of Turku, Turku University Hospital; Sinikka Luutonen, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Psychiatric Clinic, Turku University Hospital; Raimo KR Salokangas, MSc, MD, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Psychiatric Clinic, Turku University Hospital; Tero Vahlberg, MSc, Biostatistician, University of Turku; Helena Leino-Kilpi, PhD, Professor of Nursing Science, Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Turku and Nurse Manager Hospital District of South-Western Finland, Turun yliopisto, Finland
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  • Helena Leino-Kilpi

    1. Authors: Olli Oranta, MNSc, PhD Candidate, Department of Nursing Science and Psychiatric Clinic, University of Turku, Turku University Hospital; Sinikka Luutonen, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Psychiatric Clinic, Turku University Hospital; Raimo KR Salokangas, MSc, MD, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Psychiatric Clinic, Turku University Hospital; Tero Vahlberg, MSc, Biostatistician, University of Turku; Helena Leino-Kilpi, PhD, Professor of Nursing Science, Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Turku and Nurse Manager Hospital District of South-Western Finland, Turun yliopisto, Finland
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Olli Oranta, PhD Candidate, University of Turku, Department of Nursing Science and Psychiatric Clinic, Turku University Hospital, Kiinanmyllynkatu 4-8, PL 52, Turku 20521, Turku, Finland. Telephone: +358 40 7793137.
E-mail: olpeor@saunalahti.fi

Abstract

Aim.  To evaluate the effects of interpersonal counselling on health-related quality of life after myocardial infarction.

Background.  Depression is a risk factor for poor health-related quality of life after myocardial infarction. Interpersonal counselling seems to reduce depressive symptoms and distress after myocardial infarction.

Methods.  Myocardial infarction patients (n = 103) were randomised into an intervention group (n = 51) with 1–6 (mean 4·6) interpersonal counselling-sessions focusing on managing depressive symptoms and a control group (n = 52). Health-related quality of life after myocardial infarction was measured with EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D) in hospital, at six and 18 months after discharge.

Results.  No differences in the changes of health-related quality of life were found between the groups during follow-up. However, health-related quality of life improved significantly in the intervention group. In the group of patients under 60 years, the effect of interpersonal counselling was significant in the intervention group compared with the control group.

Conclusions.  Interpersonal counselling does not seem to improve health-related quality of life better than standard care after myocardial infarction in general, but it does seem to be beneficial with younger myocardial infarction patients.

Relevance to clinical practice.  There is a need to study the effects of interpersonal counselling further with younger myocardial infarction patients and to develop the intervention further, before using it systematically as part of nursing practice.

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