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Impact of action cues, self-efficacy and perceived barriers on daily foot exam practice in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with peripheral neuropathy

Authors

  • Yen-Fan Chin RN,

    RN, PhD Candidate, Lecturer
    1. Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan and School of Nursing, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan
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  • Tzu-Ting Huang RN, PhD,

    Professor, Corresponding author
    1. Healthy Aging Research Center, School of Nursing, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan
    • Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan and School of Nursing, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan
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  • Brend Ray-Sea Hsu MD, PhD

    Attending staff
    1. Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan
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Correspondence: Tzu-Ting Huang, Professor, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, No. 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Rd, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 33302, Taiwan. Telephone: +886 03 2118800 ext. 5321.

E-mail: thuang@mail.cgu.edu.tw

Abstract

Aims and objectives

To identify the effects of health belief model factors on daily foot-exam practice among diabetes mellitus patients with peripheral neuropathy.

Background

Daily foot exams are one of the most important self-care behaviours that prevent the occurrence of diabetic foot ulcers and subsequent amputation. Although daily foot exams were under-practiced in patients with peripheral neuropathy, few studies have explored modifiable social-psychological factors related to daily foot exams.

Design

A cross-sectional survey was used to collect the data.

Methods

A total of 277 patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy were recruited from two hospitals in northern Taiwan. The Family APGAR and Diabetic Foot Ulcer Health Belief Scale (DFUHBS) were used to measure family support and health belief factors respectively. Data on foot-exam practice, perceived self-efficacy and action cues were collected through the use of structured questionnaires. The data were analysed using logistic regression.

Result

The regression model revealed that select action cues (recommendations from family, friends, or health professionals), perceived self-efficacy and perceived barriers interactively influenced the participants' daily foot-exam practice.

Conclusion

Factors related to daily foot-exam practice were identified. Specifically, action cues played a significant role in motivating daily foot-exam practice in this group.

Relevance to clinical practice

This study recognises modifiable factors that influence the daily foot-exam practice of patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy. Using the findings of this study, health professionals can design interventions that aim to modify the above factors as a means to promote daily foot-exam practice.

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