The in-vitro antibacterial effects of organic salts, chemical disinfectants and antibiotics against pathogens of black disease in fairy shrimp of Thailand

Authors

  • C Saejung,

    1. Applied Taxonomic Research Center, Faculty of Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand
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  • K Hatai,

    1. Laboratory of Fish Diseases, Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University, Tokyo, Japan
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  • L Sanoamuang

    Corresponding author
    1. Applied Taxonomic Research Center, Faculty of Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand
    2. Faculty of Science, Mahasarakham University, Maha Sarakham, Thailand
    • Correspondence L Sanoamuang, Applied Taxonomic Research Center, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand (e-mail: la_orsri@kku.ac.th)

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Abstract

The antibacterial effects of organic salts, chemical disinfectants and antibiotics were evaluated on cultures of Aeromonas hydrophila C03, Aeromonas sobria C26, A. sobria C29, Aeromonas caviae C24 and Acinetobacter sp. SH-94B, the pathogens that cause black disease found in fairy shrimps (Streptocephalus sirindhornae Sanoamuang et al. (2000) and Branchinella thailandensis Sanoamuang, Saengphan & Murugan) of Thailand. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of organic salts (sodium chloride and potassium chloride) and antibiotics (oxytetracycline dihydrate, streptomycin sulphate, kanamycin monosulphate, chloramphenicol and ampicillin) were determined using the agar-dilution method. The effect of chemical disinfectants (sodium hypochlorite and chlorine dioxide) was evaluated by exposing bacteria to different concentrations of these chemicals for different periods of time. Interestingly, all strains were intrinsically resistant to 0.25–3% sodium chloride and potassium chloride. The effect of sodium hypochlorite was greater than that of chlorine dioxide, and 5–20 μg mL−1 of sodium hypochlorite was sufficient to inhibit the growth of these bacteria, but the exposure time varied, depending on the bacterial species. Of the antibiotics tested, chloramphenicol and oxytetracycline dihydrate completely inhibited the selected strains. Chloramphenicol showed the highest antibacterial effect against all pathogenic species – the MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) ranged from 0.8 to 3.1 μg mL−1 from 3.1 to 6.25 μg mL−1, respectively. To achieve control of black disease during cultivation of fairy shrimp, data derived from this study can be used as a basis for further toxicity tests in vivo.

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