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One year follow-up of overweight and obese hypertensive adults following intensive lifestyle therapy

Authors

  • M. L. Jehn,

    1. Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
    2. School of Health Management and Policy, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ
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  • M. R. Patt,

    1. Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
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  • L. J. Appel,

    1. Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
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  • E. R. Miller III

    1. Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
    2. National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, MD, USA
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Megan Jehn, PhD, MHS, School of Health Management and Policy, Arizona State University, PO Box 874506, Tempe, AZ 85287-4506, USA.
Tel.: +1 480 965 5524
Fax: +1 480 965 6654
E-mail: megan.jehn@asu.edu

Abstract

Objective  To examine the long-term effect on weight maintenance and dietary habits of participants in a clinical trial for weight loss.

Setting  Community-based residents living in Maryland.

Participants  Forty-four hypertensive, overweight adults who participated in a randomized clinical trial of weight loss. Participants were randomized to an intensive ‘lifestyle’ intervention or a ‘monitoring’ group.

Main outcome measures  Weight, self-reported current intake of fat and fruit/fibre and self-reported barriers to maintain weight loss were assessed 1 year after the completion of the Diet, Exercise and Weight-loss Intervention Trial (DEW-IT) trial.

Analysis t-tests were used to compare groups for differences in continuous variables and chi-square tests were used to compare groups for categorical variables.

Results  Fourty-two of the 44 DEW-IT subjects participated in the follow-up study. Overall, 55% (12/19) of the lifestyle intervention group remained at or below their baseline weight at 1 year, compared with 48% (11/23) of the monitoring group (P = 0.32). However, during that year, 95% (18/19) of the lifestyle intervention group and 52% (12/23) of the monitoring group gained weight from the end of the study. Both groups reported similar intake of fruits/vegetables (servings day−1), dietary fibre (g day−1) and fat (g day−1).

Conclusions and implications  The majority of participants who lost weight during the trial regained weight during the course of 1 year. A successful intensive 2-month programme of lifestyle modification (DEW-IT) was ineffective for long-term maintenance of weight loss.

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