Ethics Symposium Is Medical Ethics really in the best interest of the patient?


Contents

Introduction:366–369
Is medical ethics doing its job?
M. G. Hansson & R. Chadwick
 
Part I: Should ideology be allowed to trump patient well-being?370–382
Viewpoint: Interests, rights, and standards of care in the context of globalized medicine
H. Haker
 
Viewpoint: How to avoid a dichotomy between autonomy and beneficence: from liberalism to communitarianism and beyond
M. Sutrop
 
Commentary: Autonomy revisited – a response to H. Haker
A. V. Campbell
 
Part II: The (mis)use of informed consent in medical research383–391
Viewpoint: Why our conceptions of research and practice may not serve the best interest of patients and subjects
T. L. Beauchamp
 
Commentary: The distinction between research and practice – a response to T. Beauchamp
M. F. Verweij
 
Part III: Ethical review boards: Important ethical safeguards or over-burdensome and unnecessary bureaucracy?392–405
Viewpoint: Are the research ethics committees working in the best interests of participants in an increasingly globalised research environment?
D. Chalmers
 
Viewpoint: A method to estimate the cost in lives of ethics board review of biomedical research
S. N. Whitney & C. E. Schneider
 
Commentary: Systems, rules and the costs of being ethical – a response to D. Chalmers and to S. Whitney and C. Schneider
S. Holm
 

Ancillary