Developing team leadership to facilitate guideline utilization: planning and evaluating a 3-month intervention strategy

Authors


Wendy Gifford
University of Ottawa
Faculty of Health Sciences
School of Nursing
451 Smyth Road
Ottawa, Ontario
Canada K1H 8M5
E-mail: wgifford@uottawa.ca

Abstract

gifford w., davies b., tourangeau a. & lefebre n. (2011) Journal of Nursing Management19, 121–132
Developing team leadership to facilitate guideline utilization: planning and evaluating a 3-month intervention strategy

Background  Research describes leadership as important to guideline use. Yet interventions to develop current and future leaders for this purpose are not well understood.

Aim  To describe the planning and evaluation of a leadership intervention to facilitate nurses’ use of guideline recommendations for diabetic foot ulcers in home health care.

Method  Planning the intervention involved a synthesis of theory and research (qualitative interviews and chart audits). One workshop and three follow-up teleconferences were delivered at two sites to nurse managers and clinical leaders (n = 15) responsible for 180 staff nurses. Evaluation involved workshop surveys and interviews.

Results  Highest rated intervention components (four-point scale) were: identification of target indicators (mean 3.7), and development of a team leadership action plan (mean 3.5). Pre-workshop barriers assessment rated lowest (mean 2.9). Three months later participants indicated their leadership performance had changed as a result of the intervention, being more engaged with staff and clear about implementation goals.

Conclusions and implications for nursing management  Creating a team leadership action plan to operationalize leadership behaviours can help in delivery of evidence-informed care. Access to clinical data and understanding team leadership knowledge and skills prior to formal training will assist nursing management in tailoring intervention strategies to identify needs and gaps.

Ancillary