Effects of workplace incivility and empowerment on newly-graduated nurses’ organizational commitment

Authors

  • LESLEY MARIE SMITH RN, BMusA, MScN,

    1. Research Assistant, Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario
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  • MARY ANNE ANDRUSYSZYN RN, MScN, EdD,

    1. Professor, Director, Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario,
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  • HEATHER K. SPENCE LASCHINGER RN, PhD, FAAN, FCAHS

    1. Distinguished University Professor, Arthur Labatt Family Nursing Research Chair in Health Human Resource Optimization, Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
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Lesley Marie Smith
Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing
H38, Health Sciences Addition, Faculty of Health Sciences
The University of Western Ontario
1151 Richmond Street
London, Ontario
N6A 5C1
Canada
E-mail: lmsmith@uwo.ca

Abstract

smith l.m., andrusyszyn m.a. & laschinger h. (2010) Journal of Nursing Management18, 1004–1015
Effects of workplace incivility and empowerment on newly-graduated nurses’ organizational commitment

Aim  The purpose of the present study was to test an expanded model of Kanter’s theory by examining the influence of structural empowerment, psychological empowerment and workplace incivility on the organizational commitment of newly-graduated nurses.

Background  The early years of practice represent a significant confidence-building phase for newly-graduated nurses, yet many new nurses are exposed to disempowering experiences and incivility in the workplace.

Method  A predictive non-experimental design was used to examine the impact of structural empowerment, psychological empowerment and workplace incivility on the affective commitment of newly-graduated nurses (n = 117) working in acute care hospitals.

Results  Controlling for age, 23.1% of the variance in affective commitment was explained by structural empowerment, psychological empowerment and workplace incivility [ = 0.231, F5,107 = 6.43, = 0.000]. Access to opportunity was the most empowering factor, with access to support and formal power perceived as least empowering. Perceived co-worker incivility was greater than perceived supervisor incivility.

Conclusion  Results offer significant support for the use of Kanter’s theory in the newly-graduated nurse population.

Implications for Nursing Management  Without specific strategies in place to combat incivility and disempowerment in the workplace, attempts to prevent further organizational attrition of new members may be futile.

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