Job and career satisfaction and turnover intentions of newly graduated nurses

Authors

  • HEATHER K. SPENCE LASCHINGER RN, PHD, FAAN

    1. Distinguished University Professor and Arthur Labatt Family Nursing Research Chair, Health Human Resources Optimization, Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada
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Heather K. Spence Laschinger
Health Human Resources Optimization
Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing
University of Western Ontario
1151 Richmond Street
London, ON N6A 5CL
Canada
E-mail: hkl@uwo.ca

Abstract

laschinger h.k.s. (2012) Journal of Nursing Management 20, 472–484

Job and career satisfaction and turnover intentions of newly graduated nurses

Aim  To describe new graduate nurses’ worklife experiences in Ontario hospital settings in the first 2 years of practice and to examine predictors of job and career satisfaction and turnover intentions.

Background  With a large cohort of nurses approaching retirement, every effort must be made to ensure that the work environments of new graduate nurses are positive, promoting job satisfaction and commitment to the profession to address the nursing workforce shortage.

Method  A cross-sectional analysis of data from a mail survey of new graduate nurses (n = 342) in their first and second year of experience was used to address the research objectives.

Results  Overall, new graduate nurses were positive about their working conditions and there were few differences between nurses in their first and second years of practice. Structural and personal factors explained significant amounts of variance (31–68%) in both job and career satisfaction and turnover intentions. Empowerment, work engagement and burnout were important significant predictors.

Conclusions  Modifiable workplace factors play an important role in influencing new graduates’ job and career satisfaction and turnover intentions.

Implications for nursing management  Managers can employ strategies to enhance quality work environments that promote retention of new graduates and lessen the nursing workforce shortage.

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