Is there a relationship between risk assessment and observation level?

Authors

  • A. M. KETTLES bsc (nursing) msc (health psychology) rmn rgn rnt pgcea amibiol iltm,

    Corresponding author
    1. Research and Development Officer, Grampian Primary Care NHS Trust, Aberdeen, Scotland,
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  • E. MOIR rgn rmn dipn (london) msc (nursing administration),

    1. Director of Nursing, Borders Primary Care NHS Trust, Melrose (Formerly, Governance Programme Development Manager, Grampian Primary Care NHS Trust, Aberdeen), Scotland,
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  • P. WOODS phdrmndip,

    1. Healthcare Research, Partnerships in Care Senior Lecturer in Forensic Mental Health Nursing, Florence Nightingale School of Nursing and Midwifery, King's College, London,
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  • S. PORTER rmn nurse manager (specialisms),

    1. Formerly Ward Manager (Acute),
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  • E. SUTHERLAND rmn dipn (london) msc (management)

    1. Formerly Trustwide Services/Director of Nursing, Grampian Primary Care NHS Trust, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK
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Ms. Alyson M. Kettles, West Gask, Near Longhaven, Peterhead, Aberdeenshire AB42 0PH, UK
E-mail: clint@clint44.fsnet.co.uk

Abstract

The literature is divided into two sections, one on assessment and one on observation, with only one study that tries to make any connection between them. This study, conducted in both acute and forensic areas, attempts to show that there are some direct relationships between assessment criteria and observation levels in both these areas. An instrument was designed and implemented prospectively to collect data about both assessment criteria and the resulting decisions about observation level. Logistic Regression Analysis, descriptive, and inferential statistics, such as Chi-square and cross-tabulations, were used to analyse the data. The results showed that there is a relationship between the risk assessment and the enhanced observation level that patients are placed on at the time of admission. The nature of the relationship was limited to seven variables from the 12 in the risk assessment used. This implies that the variables may be different in risk assessment content and extent in each clinical area and we can speculate that there may be individual profiles of the assessment–observation level relationship in each clinical area.

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