Family work in first-onset psychosis: a literature review

Authors

  • R. ASKEY bsc(hons) pgdip rn,

    Corresponding author
    1. Psychosocial Therapies Practitioner, South London and Maudsley NHS Trust, Southwark Team for Early Psychosis (STEP),
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  • C. GAMBLE ba(hons) rgn rmn rnt,

    1. Consultant Nurse, South West London and St Georges Mental Health Care Trust, Main Building, Springfield University Hospital, and
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  • R. GRAY bsc(hons) msc phd rn

    1. Senior Lecturer and Head of Section, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London, UK
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R. Askey
South London and Maudsley NHS Trust
Southwark Team for Early
Psychosis (STEP)
106 Weston Street
London SE1 3QB
UK
E-mail: ryan.askey@slam.nhs.uk

Abstract

Family intervention may be helpful for people with psychosis. We reviewed the literature for family intervention for people with a first-onset psychosis. There is limited and conflicting evidence of the efficacy of family intervention for this population. Definitive randomized controlled trials are required to establish the efficacy. At this time, evidence suggests that in High Expressed Emotion (EE) families, family intervention is a possible effective intervention. We suggest caution in families with Low EE as one study suggests that in Low EE families, family intervention can increase the levels of EE.

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