Community mental health nurses' perspectives of recovery-oriented practice

Authors


S. Marshall-Lucette, Faculty of Health & Social Care Sciences, Kingston University & St George's University of London, Grosvenor Wing, 2nd Floor, Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 0RE, UK. E-mail: s.marshall-lucette@sgul.kingston.ac.uk

Abstract

Accessible summary

  • • Recovery-oriented practice, an approach aligned towards the service user perspective, has dominated the mental health care arena.
  • • Numerous studies have explored service users' accounts of the purpose, meaning and importance of ‘recovery’.
  • • Twenty-three community mental health nurses completed a selfefficacy questionnaire and 28 course documents were analysed.
  • • The findings suggest a gap in the nurses' perceived ability and confidence in recovery-oriented practice with what is taught academically.

Abstract

Recovery-oriented practice, an approach aligned towards the service user perspective, has dominated the mental health care arena. Numerous studies have explored service users' accounts of the purpose, meaning and importance of ‘recovery’; however, far less is known about healthcare staff confidence in its application to care delivery. A self-efficacy questionnaire and content analysis of nursing course documents were used to investigate a cohort of community mental health nurses' recovery-oriented practice and to determine the extent to which the current continuing professional development curriculum met their educational needs in this regard. Twenty-three community mental health nurses completed a self-efficacy questionnaire and 28 course documents were analysed. The findings revealed high levels of nurses' confidence in their understanding and ability to apply the recovery model and low levels of confidence were found in areas of social inclusion. The content analysis found only one course document that used the whole term ‘recovery model’. The findings suggest a gap in the nurses' perceived ability and confidence in recovery-oriented practice with what is taught academically. Hence, nursing education needs to be more explicitly focused on the recovery model and its application to care delivery.

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