Effects of phenylbutazone and oxyphenbutazone on basic drug detection in high performance thin layer chromatographic systems,

Authors


  • *Published as Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station Article 84-4-66 with the approval of the Dean and Director, College of Agriculture and Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station.

  • †Publication no. 101 from the Kentucky Equine Drug Testing and Research Programs, Department of Veterinary Science and the Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky.

Abstract

Woods, W.E., Chay, S., Houston, T., Blake, S.W. & Tobin, T. Effects of phenylbutazone and oxyphenbutazone on basic drug detection in high performance thin layer chromatographic systems. J. vet. Pharmacol. Therap. 8, 181–189.

Interference or ‘masking’ in thin layer chromatography occurs when the presence of one drug on a thin layer plate physically obscures or interferes with the detection of another drug. We investigated the ability of phenylbutazone and oxyphenbutazone to mask or interfere with the detection by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) of basic drugs used illegally in horse racing. Of fifty-five basic drugs called ‘positive’ since 1981 by laboratories affiliated with the Association of Official Racing Chemists (AORC), forty did not comigrate with phenylbutazone or oxyphenbutazone and could not, therefore, be masked. When 75μg/ml of oxyphenbutazone was spiked into urine samples, subjected to an extraction procedure for basic drugs, and then run in our routine HPTLC systems, no ‘spots’ due to oxyphenbutazone appeared. ‘Masking’ by oxyphenbutazone, therefore, did not and could not occur in our test systems. When phenylbutazone at a concentration of 30μg/ml was spiked into urine samples and run in the routine HPTLC system, phenylbutazone spots were visible under ultraviolet light and after certain specific oversprays were used to visualize basic drugs. These spots, however, did not interfere with routine thin layer testing for basic drugs. It was concluded that phenylbutazone and oxyphenbutazone had no significant ability to interfere with detection of the parent forms of these basic drugs under the conditions described in these experiments.

T. Tobin, Kentucky Equine Drug Research and Testing Programs, Department of Veterinary Science, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546-0076, U.S.A.

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