Pharmacokinetics of dantrolene sodium in horses

Authors

  • M. H. COURT,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Surgery, Section of Experimental Medicine, Tufts University, School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, Massachusetts, U.S.A.
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  • L. R. ENGELKING,

    1. *Department of Medicine, Section of Experimental Medicine, Tufts University, School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, Massachusetts, U.S.A.
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  • N. H. DODMAN,

    1. Department of Surgery, Section of Experimental Medicine, Tufts University, School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, Massachusetts, U.S.A.
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  • M. S. ANWER,

    1. *Department of Medicine, Section of Experimental Medicine, Tufts University, School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, Massachusetts, U.S.A.
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  • D. C. SEELER,

    1. Department of Surgery, Section of Experimental Medicine, Tufts University, School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, Massachusetts, U.S.A.
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  • M. CLARK

    1. Department of Surgery, Section of Experimental Medicine, Tufts University, School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton, Massachusetts, U.S.A.
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Department of Surgery, Tufts University, School of Veterinary Medicine, 200 Westboro Road, North Grafton, MA 01536, U.S.A.

Abstract

The pharmacokinetics of dantrolene sodium were investigated in horses following both intravenous (2 mg/kg) and intragastric (4 mg/kg) administration. Two ponies also received dantrolene sodium intravenously (2 mg/kg) in a pilot study to obtain preliminary kinetic data and to determine urinary and biliary excretion of the intact drug. Distribution and elimination of dantrolene was rapid, resulting in an elimination half-life of 129 ± 8 (SEM) min and a whole body clearance of 4.16 ± 0.52 ml/min/kg. Following intragastric administration, dantrolene rapidly acheived peak concentrations within 1.5 h, but was incompletely absorbed, with a bioavailability of 39 ± 10%. Small amounts of intact drug were recovered in urine and bile. Based upon disposition kinetics of dantrolene in these studies, intravenous and intragastric dosage regimens were determined which would maintain blood dantrolene concentrations within the predicted clinically effective range.

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