Insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists as flea adulticides in small animals

Authors

  • D. T. VO,

    1. Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA
    2. Department of Internal Diseases and Pharmacology, Faculty of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Nong Lam University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
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  • W H. HSU,

    1. Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA
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  • E. A. ABU-BASHA,

    1. Department of Veterinary Basic Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan
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  • R. J. MARTIN

    1. Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA
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Dr Walter H. Hsu, Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA. E-mail: whsu@iastate.edu

Abstract

Vo, D. T., Hsu, W. H., Abu-Basha, E. A., Martin, R. J. Insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists as flea adulticides in small animals. J. vet. Pharmacol. Therap. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2885.2010.01160.x.

Fleas are significant ectoparasites of small animals. They can be a severe irritant to animals and serve as a vector for a number of infectious diseases. In this article, we discuss the pharmacological characteristics of four insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists used as flea adulticides in dogs and cats, which include three neonicotinoids (imidacloprid, nitenpyram, and dinotefuran) and a macrocyclic lactone (spinosad). Insect nAChR agonists are one of the most important classes of insecticides, which are used to control sucking insects on both plants and animals. These novel compounds provide a new approach for practitioners to safely and effectively eliminate adult fleas.

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