Adoptive T-cell therapy as a therapeutic option for chronic hepatitis B

Authors

  • F. Bohne,

    1. Molecular Infectiology at the Centre for Molecular Medicine, Institute for Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Hygiene, University of Cologne, Cologne
    Search for more papers by this author
  • U. Protzer

    1. Molecular Infectiology at the Centre for Molecular Medicine, Institute for Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Hygiene, University of Cologne, Cologne
    2. Institute of Virology, Technical University of Munich, and Institute of Molecular Virology, GSF, Munich, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author

Prof. Ulrike Protzer, MD, Technical University of Munich, Institute of Virology, Togerstr. 30, D-50935 München, Germany. E-mail: ulrike.protzer@uni-koeln.de

Abstract

Summary.  The human hepatitis B virus is a small, enveloped and non-cytopathic virus, with a very narrow host range and a strong liver tropism causing acute and chronic liver disease. Although a well-tolerated vaccine is available, more than 350 million people are chronically infected worldwide. Available therapies for chronic hepatitis B only rarely eliminate the virus. Although new antivirals are being developed, long-term treatment is required, which may be limited by the selection of resistant viruses. Therefore, immunotherapies are investigated as an approach to eliminate persistently infected cells. Besides therapeutic vaccination, adoptive T-cell therapy is an interesting option, which is discussed in this review.

Ancillary