Responses of tsetse flies, Glossina morsitans morsitans and Glossina pallidipes, to baits of various size

Authors

  • S. J. TORR,

    Corresponding author
    1. Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, London, U.K.
      Steve Torr, Natural Resources Institute, Central Avenue, Chatham, Kent ME4 4TB, U.K. Tel.: +44 1634 883304; Fax: +44 1634 883379; E-mail: s.torr@greenwich.ac.uk
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  • A. CHAMISA,

    1. Division of Tsetse Control, Department of Veterinary Services, Harare, Zimbabwe
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  • G. A. VALE,

    1. Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, London, U.K.
    2. Southern African Centre for Epidemiological Modelling and Analysis, University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch, South Africa
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  • M. J. LEHANE,

    1. Vector Group, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, U.K.
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  • J. M. LINDH

    1. Group of Ecological Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
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Steve Torr, Natural Resources Institute, Central Avenue, Chatham, Kent ME4 4TB, U.K. Tel.: +44 1634 883304; Fax: +44 1634 883379; E-mail: s.torr@greenwich.ac.uk

Abstract

Recent studies of Palpalis group tsetse [Glossina fuscipes fuscipes (Diptera: Glossinidae) in Kenya] suggest that small (0.25 × 0.25 m) insecticide-treated targets will be more cost-effective than the larger (≥1.0 × 1.0 m) designs currently used to control tsetse. Studies were undertaken in Zimbabwe to assess whether small targets are also more cost-effective for the Morsitans group tsetse, Glossina morsitans morsitans and Glossina pallidipes. Numbers of tsetse contacting targets of 0.25 × 0.25 m or 1.0 × 1.0 m, respectively, were estimated using arrangements of electrocuting grids which killed or stunned tsetse as they contacted the target. Catches of G. pallidipes and G. m. morsitans at small (0.25 × 0.25 m) targets were, respectively, ∼1% and ∼6% of catches at large (1.0 × 1.0 m) targets. Hence, the tsetse killed per unit area of target was greater for the larger than the smaller target, suggesting that small targets are not cost-effective for use against Morsitans group species. The results suggest that there is a fundamental difference in the host-orientated behaviour of Morsitans and Palpalis group tsetse and that the former are more responsive to host odours, whereas the latter seem highly responsive to visual stimuli.

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