Detection of tick-borne pathogens in ticks from migratory birds in the Baltic region of Russia

Authors

  • A. MOVILA,

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory of Molecular Systematics, Zoological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, Russia
    2. Laboratory of Molecular Systematics and Phylogeny, Institute of Zoology, Moldova Academy of Sciences, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova
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    • Both first authors contributed equally to this publication.

  • A. N. ALEKSEEV,

    1. Laboratory of Molecular Systematics, Zoological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, Russia
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    • Both first authors contributed equally to this publication.

  • H. V. DUBININA,

    1. Laboratory of Molecular Systematics, Zoological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, Russia
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  • I. TODERAS

    1. Laboratory of Molecular Systematics and Phylogeny, Institute of Zoology, Moldova Academy of Sciences, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova
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Alexandru Movila, Laboratory of Molecular Systematics and Phylogeny, Institute of Zoology, Moldova Academy of Sciences, str. Academie, 1, Chisinau 2028, Moldova. Tel.: + 373-22-731-255; Fax: + 373-22-731-255; E-mail: acarolog1@yahoo.com

Abstract

We report the finding of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE)-virus in indigenous Ixodes ricinus (L.), ‘Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis’ in exotic Ixodes frontalis (Panzer) and Rickettsia aeshlimannii in exotic Hyalomma marginatum Koch subadult ticks detached from 18.5% (107/577) infested migratory birds in the Baltic region of Russia. This is the first record of human pathogenic ‘Candidatus N. mikurensis’ in I. frontalis ticks. Moreover, seven other pathogens were identified in I. ricinus ticks. Spotted Fever Group rickettsiae were the predominant pathogen group and were detected only in nymphs. Future investigations are warranted to further characterize the role of birds in the epizootiology of tick-borne pathogens in this region.

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