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In search of criteria for the assessment of medical education

Authors

  • A. ROTEM,

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre for Medical Education, Research and Development, University of New South Wales, Kensington, N.S.W., Australia
      Dr A. Rotem, Centre for Medical Education, Research and Development, University of New South Wales, P.O. Box 1, Kensington, New South Wales 2033, Australia.
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  • PIPPA CRAIG,

    1. Centre for Medical Education, Research and Development, University of New South Wales, Kensington, N.S.W., Australia
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  • K. COX,

    1. Centre for Medical Education, Research and Development, University of New South Wales, Kensington, N.S.W., Australia
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  • CHRISTINE EWAN

    1. Centre for Medical Education, Research and Development, University of New South Wales, Kensington, N.S.W., Australia
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Dr A. Rotem, Centre for Medical Education, Research and Development, University of New South Wales, P.O. Box 1, Kensington, New South Wales 2033, Australia.

Summary

This paper describes results of a study to asses whether an undergraduate educational curriculum is ‘relevant’. The people surveyed comprised 290 individuals involved in medical education or health service administration. They were asked to suggest five major criteria for judging whether a medical undergraduate programme is relevant or not and to say whether they felt current curricula meet these criteria. Of those sampled, 40 % replied.

An analysis of the data from respondents showed that medical school professors and senior administrators of health services in Australia have roughly similar expectations of the outcome of medical education. Both groups were concerned that graduates be conscious of health care requirements and costs, that they have adequate clinical skills, knowledge in medical school subjects and skill in interacting with patients and managing their continuing education. On the various dimensions examined there were frequently strong expressions of dissatisfaction with current achievements.

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