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Patients as educators – Time to reflect?

  1. Top of page
  2. Patients as educators – Time to reflect?
  3. Exploring patients’ understanding of professionalism
  4. Modern approaches to using standardised patients
  5. Student perceptions of portfolio assessment

There is increasing emphasis on patient involvement in medical education. To date there is little evidence of strategies and interventions that are effective in facilitating this involvement. What is the role of patients in education? How should patients be prepared for this role? Is there any consideration for the impact that such involvement has on patients and students? In this systematic review Jha et al. integrate the evidence in order to answer these questions.

Jha V, Quinton ND, Bekker HL, Roberts TE. Strategies and interventions for the involvement of real patients in medical education: a systematic review. Med Educ 2009;43:10–20.

Exploring patients’ understanding of professionalism

  1. Top of page
  2. Patients as educators – Time to reflect?
  3. Exploring patients’ understanding of professionalism
  4. Modern approaches to using standardised patients
  5. Student perceptions of portfolio assessment

Patient-centred practice is seen as an essential component of modern medical professionalism. However, relatively little literature exists on patients’ perceptions of the attributes of physicians’ professionalism. Wiggins and colleagues conducted a survey of adult Opthalmology patients at an academic centre to learn which physician characteristics and behaviours most closely represent patients’ views. Understanding which components of professionalism are most important to patients will improve patient interaction skills and benefit physician/patient relationships.

Wiggins MN, Coker K, Hicks EK. Patient perceptions of professionalism: implications for residency education. Med Educ 2009;43:28–33.

Modern approaches to using standardised patients

  1. Top of page
  2. Patients as educators – Time to reflect?
  3. Exploring patients’ understanding of professionalism
  4. Modern approaches to using standardised patients
  5. Student perceptions of portfolio assessment

If Telephone Incognito Standardised Patients (TISPs) are used for research of quality of health care, the quality of their role-playing needs to be investigated as well. In this paper Derkx and colleagues develop a method of using TISPs effectively in the assessment of out-of-hours health care. Twelve TISPs were trained in role-playing and self-recording their calls. Extra training for playing the role using merely verbal communication helped them to play the role more naturally. They called on 84 evenings to different Dutch out-of-hours centres (OOH). The methods used resulted in almost 100 per cent of the TISP calls remaining undetected.

Derkx H, Rethans JJ, Maiburg B, Winkens R, Knottnerus A. New methodology for using incognito standardised patients for telephone consultation in primary care. Med Educ 2009;43:82–88.

Student perceptions of portfolio assessment

  1. Top of page
  2. Patients as educators – Time to reflect?
  3. Exploring patients’ understanding of professionalism
  4. Modern approaches to using standardised patients
  5. Student perceptions of portfolio assessment

Many medical schools are implementing portfolio assessment, but how is this viewed by students? In this study by Davis et al. students at Dundee Medical School completed a questionnaire survey to identify their reactions to the portfolio assessment process. Student reaction was initially negative, but became positive over time, with students identifying that the portfolio assessment process supported achievement of the institutionally set learning outcomes. Students continued to find the paperwork involved excessive throughout the study. Those wishing to implement a portfolio assessment process should endeavour to keep the paperwork within manageable limits.

Davis MH, Ponnamperuma GG, Ker JS. Student perceptions of a portfolio assessment process. Med Educ 2009;43:89–98.

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