Genetic differentiation in Hippocrepis emerus (Leguminosae): allozyme and DNA fingerprint variation in disjunct Scandinavian populations

Authors

  • M. Lönn,

    Corresponding author
    1. *Department of Ecological Botany, Uppsala University, Villavägen 14, S-752 36 Uppsala
    2. †Department of Genetics, Uppsala University, Box 7003, S-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
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  • H. C. Prentice,

    1. *Department of Ecological Botany, Uppsala University, Villavägen 14, S-752 36 Uppsala
    2. †Department of Genetics, Uppsala University, Box 7003, S-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
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    • ‡Department of Systematic Botany, University of Lund, Ö. Vallgatan 18–20, S-223 61 Lund, Sweden.

  • H. Tegelström

    1. †Department of Genetics, Uppsala University, Box 7003, S-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden
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  • ‡Department of Systematic Botany, University of Lund, Ö. Vallgatan 18–20, S-223 61 Lund, Sweden.

  • Mikael Lönn and Honor Prentice are interested in the ecological and population processes that influence the structuring of genetic diversity within and among plant populations on different spatial scales. Hakan Tegelstriim works mainly on molecular evolution and ecological genetics in animals. The authors share an interest in the biogeography of Fennoscandia and the extent to which patterns of genetic differentiation can throw light on the postglacial immigration history of Swedish animals and plants.

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Abstract

The structure of genetic variation in disjunct Scandinavian populations of Hippocrepis emerus was studied using allozymes and DNA fingerprinting. Variation in the three native regional populations in Scandinavia was compared with that in a recently introduced population in Sweden. In contrast to the recently introduced population, the native Scandinavian isolates of H. emerus showed high levels of allozyme fixation and low levels of DNA diversity. Variation in allozymes and at DNA fingerprint loci showed closely congruent patterns of geographic variation, with pronounced differentiation between the native Norwegian and Swedish isolates of the species. The structure of genetic variation in native Scandinavian H. emerus is interpreted in terms of historical population bottlenecks and founder events during the species' postglacial immigration into Scandinavia.

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