Microsatellites provide insight into contrasting mating patterns in arribada vs. non-arribada olive ridley sea turtle rookeries

Authors

  • M. P. JENSEN,

    1. Department of Biological Sciences, Ecology and Genetics, University of Aarhus, Ny Munkegade, Build. 540, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark,
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  • F. A. ABREU-GROBOIS,

    1. Apartado Postal 811, Unidad Académica Mazatlán, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, UNAM, Mazatlán, Sinaloa, Mexico 82000
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  • J. FRYDENBERG,

    1. Department of Biological Sciences, Ecology and Genetics, University of Aarhus, Ny Munkegade, Build. 540, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark,
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  • V. LOESCHCKE

    1. Department of Biological Sciences, Ecology and Genetics, University of Aarhus, Ny Munkegade, Build. 540, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark,
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  • Present address: Applied Ecology Research Group, University of Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia

Michael P. Jensen. E-mail: michael@mpj.eu

Abstract

Molecular studies of sea turtles have shown that the frequency of multiple paternity (MP) varies between species, and between rookeries of the same species. This study uses nuclear microsatellite markers to compare the incidence of MP in two neighbouring olive ridley rookeries on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, with contrasting nesting behaviours — the ‘arribada’ population nesting at Ostional and the solitary nesters of Playa Hermosa. Using two highly polymorphic microsatellite markers, we tested 13 nests from each location and found a significant difference (P < 0.001) between the level of MP of the arribada rookery (92%— the highest found for marine turtles) and that of the solitary nesting rookery (30%). Additional analyses based on six microsatellite loci revealed no genetic differentiation between nesting females from the two locations, or between nesting females and attendant males from the Ostional breeding area. Sixty-nine per cent of the nests with MP were fathered by a minimum of three different males, and three nests showed evidence of at least four fathers. The results suggest that the differences observed in levels of MP between arribada and solitary rookeries are due to an effect of abundance of individuals on the mating system. This is supported by a regression analysis combining other paternity studies on sea turtles which shows that levels of MP increase with increasing abundance of nesting females.

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