Genetic evidence reveals temporal change in hybridization patterns in a wild baboon population

Authors

  • J. TUNG,

    1. Department of Biology, Duke University, PO Box 90338, Durham, NC 27708, USA,
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  • M. J. E. CHARPENTIER,

    1. Department of Biology, Duke University, PO Box 90338, Durham, NC 27708, USA,
    2. Centre d’Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, Unite Mixte de Recherche 5175, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1919 Route de Mende, 34293 Montpellier Cedex 5, France,
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  • D. A. GARFIELD,

    1. Department of Biology, Duke University, PO Box 90338, Durham, NC 27708, USA,
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  • J. ALTMANN,

    1. Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540, USA,
    2. Institute of Primate Research, National Museums of Kenya, PO Box 24481, Nairobi, Kenya
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  • S. C. ALBERTS

    1. Department of Biology, Duke University, PO Box 90338, Durham, NC 27708, USA,
    2. Institute of Primate Research, National Museums of Kenya, PO Box 24481, Nairobi, Kenya
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Jenny Tung, Fax: +01 919-660-7293; E-mail: jt5@duke.edu

Abstract

The process and consequences of hybridization are of interest to evolutionary biologists because of the importance of hybridization in understanding reproductive isolation, speciation, and the influence of introgression on population genetic structure. Recent studies of hybridization have been enhanced by the advent of sensitive, genetic marker-based techniques for inferring the degree of admixture occurring within individuals. Here we present a genetic marker-based analysis of hybridization in a large-bodied, long-lived mammal over multiple generations. We analysed patterns of hybridization between yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus) and anubis baboons (Papio anubis) in a well-studied natural population in Amboseli National Park, Kenya, using genetic samples from 450 individuals born over the last 36 years. We assigned genetic hybrid scores based on genotypes at 14 microsatellite loci using the clustering algorithm implemented in structure 2.0, and assessed the robustness of these scores by comparison to pedigree information and through simulation. The genetic hybrid scores showed generally good agreement with previous morphological assessments of hybridity, but suggest that genetic methods may be more sensitive for identification of low levels of hybridity. The results of our analysis indicate that the proportion of hybrids in the Amboseli population has grown over time, but that the average proportion of anubis ancestry within hybrids is gradually decreasing. We argue that these patterns are probably a result of both selective and nonselective processes, including differences in the timing of life-history events for hybrid males relative to yellow baboon males, and stochasticity in long-distance dispersal from the source anubis population into Amboseli.

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