Factors affecting the reproductive success of dominant male meerkats

Authors

  • GÖRAN F. SPONG,

    1. Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK,
    2. Department of Animal Ecology, Uppsala University, Norbyvägen 18D, 752 36 Uppsala, Sweden,
    3. Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0001, South Africa
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  • SARAH J. HODGE,

    1. Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK,
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  • ANDREW J. YOUNG,

    1. Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK,
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  • TIM H. CLUTTON-BROCK

    1. Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK,
    2. Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0001, South Africa
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Göran F. Spong, SLU, Dept. Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden. Fax: + 46 90 786 8162; E-mail: goran.spong@vfm.slu.se

Abstract

Identifying traits that affect the reproductive success of individuals is fundamental for our understanding of evolutionary processes. In cooperative breeders, a dominant male typically restricts mating access to the dominant female for extended periods, resulting in pronounced variation in reproductive success among males. This may result in strong selection for traits that increase the likelihood of dominance acquisition, dominance retention and reproductive rates while dominant. However, despite considerable research on reproductive skew, few studies have explored the factors that influence these three processes among males in cooperative species. Here we use genetic, behavioural and demographic data to investigate the factors affecting reproductive success in dominant male meerkats (Suricata suricatta). Our data show that dominant males sire the majority of all offspring surviving to 1 year. A male's likelihood of becoming dominant is strongly influenced by age, but not by weight. Tenure length and reproductive rate, both important components of dominant male reproductive success, are largely affected by group size and composition, rather than individual traits. Dominant males in large groups have longer tenures, but after this effect is controlled, male tenure length also correlates negatively to the number of adult females in the group. Male reproductive rate also declines as the number of intra- and extra-group competitors increases. As the time spent in the dominant position and reproductive rate while dominant explain > 80% of the total variance in reproductive success, group composition thus has major implications for male reproductive success.

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