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Appendix S1 Taxonomic Summary of C. egesta and C. confusa.

Fig. S1 Neighbor-Joining tree of short COI barcodes from 85 specimens of C. egesta sensu lato. The specimens fall into two major clades corresponding to the cryptic species, C. egesta s. s. and C. confusa. Specimen labels include the country and localities of origin, with the country names colored to illustrate their position in the map of Africa (top left). The two species are mostly allopatric, overlapping only in Cameroon. The specimen ABR5 from northwest Tanzania was excluded due to poor sequence quality in the region of the barcode.

Fig. S2 Variation in the extent of melanization on wings of adult male C. egesta (A-C) and C. confusa (D-F). The specimens of each species are arranged from west to east – with the eastern most C. egesta (C) and the western most C. confusa (D) coming from the area of sympatry in Cameroon. The cross-species longitudinal cline in melanization can be seen by disregarding the species assignments and examining the specimens in order from west to east (A-F). A) Light C. egesta f. degesta from Vane, Ghana. B) Typical western C. egesta from Bobiri, Ghana. C) Darker and slightly orange C. egesta from Cameroon. D) Light C. confusa from Cameroon. E) Typical C. confusa from Shaba, Congo (DRC) that matches the holotype closely. F) Very dark C. confusa male from Tanganyika Province, eastern Congo (DRC). Background yellow color tone of different specimens are not directly comparable due to differences in photographic methods and postprocessing. Males average 6.5 cm in wing-span. Females not shown.

Fig. S3 Estimated divergence time between C. egesta and C. confusa. The curves represent the posterior probability densities of divergence time estimated using the program MDIV assuming two different values for the mutation rates (u). The set of curves on the left and right represent the same four independent runs of the program with u assumed to be either 1.15% (Brower 1994) or 0.78% (Zakharov et al. 2004), respectively.

Table S1 Collection information associated with the butterfly specimens examined this study

Table S2 Primers used for amplifying and sequencing the mtDNA COI gene from low and high quality (poorly and well preserved) C. egesta specimens

Table S3 PCR recipes used in combination with the C. egesta specific primers for specimens yielding high and low quality DNA

Table S4 PCR cycling protocols used in combination with the C. egesta specific primers. The standard protocol was used for high quality specimens, and the “touchdown” protocol was used specifically for older specimens that yielded low quality DNA

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Please note: Wiley Blackwell is not responsible for the content or functionality of any supporting information supplied by the authors. Any queries (other than missing content) should be directed to the corresponding author for the article.