Fibre Bragg gratings for high spectral and temporal resolution astronomical observations

Authors

  • Geraldine Mariën,

    Corresponding author
    1. MQ Photonics Research Centre, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    2. MQ Research Centre in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    3. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
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  • Nemanja Jovanović,

    1. MQ Photonics Research Centre, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    2. MQ Research Centre in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    3. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    4. Australian Astronomical Observatory, NSW 2122, Australia
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  • Nick Cvetojević,

    1. MQ Photonics Research Centre, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    2. MQ Research Centre in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    3. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
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  • Robert Williams,

    1. MQ Photonics Research Centre, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    2. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    3. Centre of Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Macquarie University node, NSW 2109, Australia
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  • Roger Haynes,

    1. innoFSPEC – Leibniz-Institut finline imager Astrophysik Potsdam, 14482 Potsdam, Germany
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  • Jon Lawrence,

    1. MQ Photonics Research Centre, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    2. MQ Research Centre in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    3. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    4. Australian Astronomical Observatory, NSW 2122, Australia
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  • Quentin Parker,

    1. MQ Research Centre in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    2. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    3. Australian Astronomical Observatory, NSW 2122, Australia
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  • Michael J. Withford

    1. MQ Photonics Research Centre, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    2. MQ Research Centre in Astronomy, Astrophysics and Astrophotonics, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    3. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia
    4. Centre of Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Macquarie University node, NSW 2109, Australia
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E-mail: geraldine.marien@mq.edu.au

ABSTRACT

Dynamic spectral analysis of astronomical events has the potential to deliver the information needed to clarify or complete important theoretical descriptions of astronomical phenomena. There is currently a lack of detailed sub-minute observations due to limitations in instruments and detectors. Here, we present an investigation into the feasibility of using fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) as single-line spectral filters specifically for temporal spectral astronomy, attaining both a high spectral and fast temporal resolution simultaneously. We present the device concept and discuss it in the context of two readily available FBG profiles. We demonstrate that this instrument concept could resolve spectral shifts down to 0.02 nm (3.9 km s−1) with sub-second temporal resolution on a 4-m class telescope, which is far superior to existing techniques that attain resolutions of 0.05 nm over several minutes.

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