SOME RECENT ADVANCES IN THE CLINICAL ASPECTS OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

Authors


Abstract

Tallis R.C. (1980) Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology 6,325–335

Annotation. Some recent advances in the clinical aspects of multiple sclerosis Recent work on the clinical aspects of multiple sclerosis is reviewed with particular regard to symptomatology: New approaches to clinical symptoms and the identification of more subtle impairments are illustrated by recent studies of visual function in M.S. patients; pathophysiology: It is now widely appreciated that the dysfunction observed in patients is not determined solely by histologically demonstrable demyelination. The function of the demye-linated neuron is highly variable, being dependent upon factors which may change from day to day. Recent ideas about ‘neuro-electric blocking factors’ and other factors that may influence demyelinated neurons and hence symptoms are discussed; diagnosis: tests on C.S.F., electro-physiological and psychophysiological tests and computer tomography as aids to diagnosis and the controversy over ‘specific’ blood tests are reviewed; course and prognosis: Long term follow-up studies confirm that, in a significant proportion of cases, the course of M.S. may be benign and have identified some early prognostic indices; Treatment: The results of trials of symptomatic (spinal cord stimulation) and would-be curative therapies (such as dietary supplementation with poly-unsaturated fatty acids and immunosuppression) are briefly discussed.

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