Risk of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in relation to maternal co-morbid mood and migraine disorders during pregnancy

Authors

  • Swee May Cripe,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Washington
      Dr Swee May Cripe, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Box 357236, Seattle, WA 98195-7236, USA. E-mail: smtang@uw.edu
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  • Ihunnaya O. Frederick,

    1. Center for Perinatal Studies, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA
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  • Chunfang Qiu,

    1. Center for Perinatal Studies, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA
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  • Michelle A. Williams

    1. Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Washington
    2. Center for Perinatal Studies, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA
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Dr Swee May Cripe, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Box 357236, Seattle, WA 98195-7236, USA. E-mail: smtang@uw.edu

Summary

Cripe SM, Frederick IO, Qiu CF, Williams MA. Risk of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy in relation to maternal co-morbid mood and migraine disorders during pregnancy. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology 2011.

We evaluated the risks of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy among pregnant women with mood and migraine disorders, using a cohort study of 3432 pregnant women. Maternal pre-pregnancy or early pregnancy (<20 weeks gestation) mood disorder and pre-pregnancy migraine diagnoses were ascertained from interview and medical record review. We fitted generalised linear models to derive risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy for women with isolated mood, isolated migraine and co-morbid mood-migraine disorders, respectively. Reported RR were adjusted for maternal age, race/ethnicity, marital status, parity, smoking status, chronic hypertension or pre-existing diabetes mellitus, and pre-pregnancy body mass index. Women without mood or migraine disorders were defined as the reference group. The risks for preterm delivery and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy were more consistently elevated among women with co-morbid mood-migraine disorders than among women with isolated mood or migraine disorder. Women with co-morbid disorders were almost twice as likely to deliver preterm (adjusted RR = 1.87, 95% CI 1.05, 3.34) compared with the reference group. There was no clear evidence of increased risks of preterm delivery and its subtypes with isolated migraine disorder. Women with mood disorder had elevated risks of pre-eclampsia (adjusted RR = 3.57, 95% CI 1.83, 6.99). Our results suggest an association between isolated migraine disorder and pregnancy-induced hypertension (adjusted RR = 1.42, 95% CI 1.00, 2.01). This is the first study examining perinatal outcomes in women with co-morbid mood-migraine disorders. Pregnant women with a history of migraine may benefit from screening for depression during prenatal care and vigilant monitoring, especially for women with co-morbid mood and migraine disorders.

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