Does transpiration have an essential function in long-distance ion transport in plants?

Authors

  • W. TANNER,

    Corresponding author
    1. Lehrstuhl für Zellbiologie und Pflanzenphysiologie der Universität Regensburg. Universitätsstraße 31, 8400 Regensburg, F.R.G.
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  • H. BEEVERS

    1. Lehrstuhl für Zellbiologie und Pflanzenphysiologie der Universität Regensburg. Universitätsstraße 31, 8400 Regensburg, F.R.G.
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      Permanent address: Biology Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, U.S.A.


Professor Dr W. Tanner, Lehrstuhl für Zellbiologic und Pflanzenphysiologie, Universität Regensburg, Universitätsstraße 31, 8400 Regensburg, F.R.G.

Abstract

Abstract. Long-term effects of transpiration on growth and on long-distance ion transport were investigated in maize over a whole growth cycle. Maize plants were grown with nutrients supplied at adequate levels in hydroculture or in soil at 50–60% and at >95% relative humidity. Although the amount of water lost by the plants under these conditions differed by a factor 2 to 3, there was neither a decrease in growth (fresh weight and dry weight) nor in ash content of the ‘humid’plants. This was also found when the upper part of the shoot (70–150 cm) was tested separately. It is suggested that transpiration is not essential for long-distance transport of mineral elements in plants. Alternatives are discussed.

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