Modelling advection and diffusion of water isotopologues in leaves

Authors

  • MATTHIAS CUNTZ,

    Corresponding author
    1. Environmental Biology Group, Research School of Biological Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia,
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      Present address: Max-Planck-Institut für Biochemie, Jena, Germany.

  • JÉRÔME OGÉE,

    1. Functional Ecology and Environmental Physics (EPHYSE), INRA, Villenave d'Ornon, France and
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  • GRAHAM D. FARQUHAR,

    1. Environmental Biology Group, Research School of Biological Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia,
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  • PHILIPPE PEYLIN,

    1. BiOEMCO, CNRS/INRA/UPMC, Grignon, France
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  • LUCAS A. CERNUSAK

    1. Environmental Biology Group, Research School of Biological Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia,
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    • Present address: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Republic of Panama.


M. Cuntz. Fax: +49 3641 57 7353; e-mail: mcuntz@bgc-jena.mpg.de

ABSTRACT

We described advection and diffusion of water isotopologues in leaves in the non-steady state, applied specifically to amphistomatous leaves. This explains the isotopic enrichment of leaf water from the xylem to the mesophyll, and we showed how it relates to earlier models of leaf water enrichment in non-steady state. The effective length or tortuosity factor of isotopologue movement in leaves is unknown and, therefore, is a fitted parameter in the model. We compared the advection–diffusion model to previously published data sets for Lupinus angustifolius and Eucalyptus globulus. Night-time stomatal conductance was not measured in either data set and is therefore another fitted parameter. The model compared very well with the observations of bulk mesophyll water during the whole diel cycle. It compared well with the enrichment at the evaporative sites during the day but showed some deviations at night for E. globulus. It became clear from our analysis that night-time stomatal conductance should be measured in the future and that the temperature dependence of the tracer diffusivities should be accounted for. However, varying mesophyll water volume did not seem critical for obtaining a good prediction of leaf water enrichment, at least in our data sets. In addition, observations of single diurnal cycles do not seem to constrain the effective length that relates to the tortuosity of the water path in the mesophyll. Finally, we showed when simpler models of leaf water enrichment were suitable for applications of leaf water isotopes once weighted with the appropriate gas exchange flux. We showed that taking an unsuitable leaf water enrichment model could lead to large biases when cumulated over only 1 day.

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