Characterization of Tomato curly stunt virus: a new tomato-infecting begomovirus from South Africa

Authors

  • G. Pietersen,

    1. Citrus Research International, Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa;
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    • Former address: ARC-Plant Protection Research Institute, Private Bag X134, Queenswood, Pretoria0121, South Africa

  • A. M. Idris,

    1. Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721, USA; and
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  • K. Krüger,

    1. Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa
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    • Former address: ARC-Plant Protection Research Institute, Private Bag X134, Queenswood, Pretoria0121, South Africa

  • J. K. Brown

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson 85721, USA; and
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*E-mail: jbrown@Ag.arizona.edu

Abstract

The biological and molecular characterization of a virus recognized as a distinct begomovirus species, Tomato curly stunt virus (ToCSV), first observed in South Africa in 1997, is reported here. Whitefly-transmission and host-range studies were carried out using a Bemisia tabaci colony identified as the B-biotype. The experimental host range of ToCSV spanned primarily species in the Solanaceae and Fabaceae. The complete ToCSV genome (2·766 kb) was amplified by PCR, cloned, and the DNA sequence determined. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that ToCSV was most closely related to Tobacco leaf curl Zimbabwe virus (TbLCZV), at 84% nucleotide identity, indicating that ToCSV is a new species in the genus Begomovirus that is probably endemic to southern Africa. The ToCSV genome sequence contained all of the hallmark coding and non-coding features characteristic of other previously recognized monopartite begomoviruses. ToCSV is only the second begomovirus described from southern Africa that infects solanaceous species. Neither a begomoviral DNA-B component nor a satellite-like DNA molecule was detected by PCR in extracts of ToCSV-infected plants.

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