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Keywords:

  • core collection;
  • Malus × domestica;
  • Malus sieversii;
  • Malus sylvestris;
  • quantitative resistance loci;
  • quantitative trait loci

Evaluations of plant resistance to pathogens are rarely made using isolates from wild habitats, although the heterogeneity of such habitats may generate pathogen diversity which could be a source of new virulence in cultivated habitats. The aim of this study was to investigate whether scab resistance factors, identified and characterized in apples using isolates of Venturia inaequalis from a cultivated habitat, remained effective against isolates from a wild habitat. Three V. inaequalis core collections originating from the cultivated apple Malus × domestica and from two wild species, M. sieversii and M. sylvestris, were established to maximize pathogen diversity. For each core collection, 10 isolates were inoculated in mixtures onto 51 genotypes from an apple progeny segregating for two qualitative resistance genes and six quantitative resistance loci (QRL). On each apple genotype, isolates that contributed to the scab symptoms were identified within the mixture using microsatellite markers. The most frequently detected isolates were inoculated singly to compare their aggressiveness according to their host origin. The results showed that isolates from a wild habitat were able to infect the susceptible apple genotypes. However, these isolates were never more aggressive than isolates from the cultivated habitat on the resistance factors tested. It can therefore be concluded that the resistance factors used in this study, identified with V. inaequalis isolates from a cultivated habitat, remained effective against isolates from M. sylvestris and M. sieversii.