Spread and development of quambalaria shoot blight in spotted gum plantations

Authors

  • G. S. Pegg,

    Corresponding author
    1. Tree Pathology Centre, The University of Queensland & Agri-Science Queensland, Ecosciences Precinct, Qld 4068
    2. Agri-Science Queensland, Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation, Indooroopilly, Qld 4068
      E-mail: Geoff.Pegg@deedi.qld.gov.au
    Search for more papers by this author
  • H. Nahrung,

    1. Agri-Science Queensland, Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation, Indooroopilly, Qld 4068
    Search for more papers by this author
  • A. J. Carnegie,

    1. Forest Science Centre, Industry & Investment NSW, Beecroft, NSW 2119, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • M. J. Wingfield,

    1. Forestry and Agriculture Biotechnology Institute, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa
    Search for more papers by this author
  • A. Drenth

    1. Tree Pathology Centre, The University of Queensland & Agri-Science Queensland, Ecosciences Precinct, Qld 4068
    Search for more papers by this author

E-mail: Geoff.Pegg@deedi.qld.gov.au

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the disease development of quambalaria shoot blight, caused by the fungal pathogen Quambalaria pitereka, in plantation-grown spotted gum (Corymbia citriodora subsp. citriodora, C. citriodora subsp. variegata, C. henryi and C. maculata) in south-east Queensland, Australia. The results showed that native spotted gums are a primary source of inoculum followed rapidly by the production of secondary inoculum from infected trees in the plantation. The rate of spread and development of Q. pitereka within plantations increased exponentially over time as additional trees became infected and produced secondary inoculum. Spore concentration was shown to play an important role in disease development, with disease severity increasing with increasing disease incidence on individual trees and incidence across the plantation.

Ancillary