SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • Adams MJ, Antoniw JF, Bar-Joseph M et al. , 2004. The new plant virus family Flexiviridae and assessment of molecular criteria for species demarcation. Archives of Virology 149, 104560.
  • Adams MJ, Accotto GP, Agranovsky AA et al. , 2005. Family Flexiviridae. In: Fauquet CM, Mayo MA, Maniloff J, Desselberger U, Ball LA, eds. Virus Taxonomy, VIIIth Report of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. London, UK: Elsevier/Academic Press, 1087122.
  • Al Rwahnih M, Turturo C, Minafra A et al. , 2004. Molecular variability of Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus in different hosts and geographical regions. Journal of Plant Pathology 86, 11722.
  • Barone M, Alioto D, Marais A, Candresse T, Ragozzino A, 2006. First report and high prevalence in noncherry host of Cherry virus A in Italy. Plant Disease 90, 1459.
  • Belshaw R, Pybus OG, Rambaut A, 2007. The evolution of genome compression and genomic novelty in RNA viruses. Genome Research 17, 1496504.
  • Candresse T, Lanneau M, Revers F et al. , 1995. An immunocapture-PCR assay adapted for the detection and the analysis of the molecular variability of Apple chlorotic leaf spot trichovirus. Acta Horticulturae 386, 13647.
  • Eastwell KC, Bernardy MG, 1998. Relationship of Cherry virus A to little cherry disease in British Columbia. Acta Horticulturae 472, 30513.
  • Foissac X, Svanella-Dumas L, Gentit P, Dulucq MJ, Marais A, Candresse T, 2005. Polyvalent degenerate oligonucleotides reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction: a polyvalent detection and characterization tool for trichoviruses, capilloviruses, and foveaviruses. Phytopathology 95, 61725.
  • Hirata H, Yamaji Y, Komatsu K et al. , 2010. Pseudo-polyprotein translated from the full-length ORF1 of capillovirus is important for pathogenicity, but a truncated ORF1 protein without variable and CP regions is sufficient for replication. Virus Research 152, 19.
  • Isogai M, Aoyagi J, Nakagawa M et al. , 2004. Molecular detection of five cherry viruses from sweet cherry trees in Japan. Journal of General Plant Pathology 70, 28891.
  • James D, Jelkmann W, 1998. Detection of Cherry virus A in Canada and Germany. Acta Horticulturae 472, 299303.
  • Jelkmann W, 1995. Cherry virus A: cDNA cloning of dsRNA, nucleotide sequence analysis and serology reveal a new plant capillovirus in sweet cherry. Journal of General Virology 76, 201524.
  • Keese PK, Gibbs A, 1992. Origins of genes: “big bang” or continuous creation? Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 89, 948993.
  • Lartey RT, Voss TC, Melcher U, 1996. Tobamovirus evolution: gene overlaps, recombination, and taxonomic implications. Molecular and Biological Evolution 13, 132738.
  • Magome H, Yoshikawa N, Takahashi T, Ito T, Miyakawa T, 1997. Molecular variability of the genomes of capilloviruses from apple, Japanese pear, European pear, and citrus trees. Phytopathology 87, 38996.
  • Mandic B, Matic S, Al Rwahnih M, Jelkmann W, Myrta A, 2007. Viruses of sweet and sour cherry in Serbia. Journal of Plant Pathology 89, 1038.
  • Marais A, Faure C, Svanella-Dumas L, Candresse T, 2008a. First report of Cherry virus A (CVA) in Japanese apricot (Prunus mume) in China. Plant Disease 92, 1589.
  • Marais A, Svanella-Dumas L, Barone M, Ragozzino A, Candresse T, 2008b. Genomic diversity of Cherry capillovirus A (CVA) and suitability of various assays for its detection. Acta Horticulturae 781, 3745.
  • Marais A, Candresse T, Svanella-Dumas L, Jelkmann W, 2011. Cherry virus A. In: Hadidi A, Barba M, Candresse T, Jelkmann W, eds. Virus and Virus-like Diseases of Pome and Stone Fruits. St Paul, MN, USA: APS Press, in press.
  • Martelli GP, Adams MJ, Kreuze JF, Dolja VV, 2007. Family Flexiviridae: a case study in virion and genome plasticity. Annual Review of Phytopathology 45, 73100.
  • Nei M, Gojobori T, 1986. Simple methods for estimating the numbers of synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions. Molecular and Biological Evolution 6, 41823.
  • Noorani MS, Awasthi P, Singh RM et al. , 2010. Complete nucleotide sequence of Cherry virus A (CVA) infecting sweet cherry in India. Archives of Virology 155, 207982.
  • Sabanadzovic S, Abou-Ghanem-Sabanadzovic N, Rowhani A, Grant JA, Uyemoto JK, 2005. Detection of Cherry virus A, Cherry necrotic rusty mottle virus and Little cherry virus 1 in California orchards. Journal of Plant Pathology 87, 1737.
  • Sambrook J, Fritsch EF, Maniatis T, 1989. Molecular Cloning: a Laboratory Manual, 2nd edn. Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.
  • Svanella-Dumas L, Marais A, Gentit P, Lamorte J, Candresse T, 2005. First report on the natural occurence of Cherry virus A in Mirabelle plum (Prunus domestica var. insititia). Plant Disease 89, 443.
  • Tamura K, Dudley J, Nei M, Kumar S, 2007. mega4: molecular evolutionary genetics analysis (mega) software version 4.0. Molecular Biology and Evolution 24, 15969.
  • Tatineni S, Afunian MR, Gowda S, Hilf ME, Bar-Joseph M, Dawson WO, 2009. Characterization of the 5′- and 3′-terminal subgenomic RNAs produced by a capillovirus: evidence for a CP subgenomic RNA. Virology 385, 5218.
  • Thompson JD, Higgins DG, Gibson TJ, 1994. clustal w: improving the sensitivity of progressive multiple sequence alignment through sequence weighting, position-specific gap penalties and weight matrix choice. Nucleic Acids Research 22, 467380.
  • Wetzel T, Tavert G, Teycheney PY, Ravelonandro M, Candresse T, Dunez J, 1990. Dot hybridization detection of Plum pox virus using 32P-labeled RNA probes representing non-structural viral protein genes. Journal of Virological Methods 30, 16171.
  • Yoshikawa N, Sasaki E, Kato M, Takahashi T, 1992. The nucleotide sequence of Apple stem grooving capillovirus genome. Virology 191, 98105.