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Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate whether major abdominal surgery leads to complement activation and interleukin response and whether the kind of anaesthesia influence complement activation and the release of inflammatory interleukins. The study design was prospective and randomised. Fifty patients undergoing open major colorectal surgery due to cancer disease or inflammatory bowel disease were studied. Twenty-five patients were given total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) with propofol and remifentanil, and 25 patients were given inhalational anaesthesia with sevoflurane and fentanyl. To determine complement activation (C3a and SC5b-9) and the release of pro- and anti-inflammatory interleukins (tumour necrosis factor-a (TNF-a)), interleukin-1b (IL-1b), IL-6, IL-8, IL-4 and IL-10), blood samples were drawn preoperatively, 60 minutes after start of surgery, 30 minutes after end of surgery and 24 hours postoperatively. Complement was activated and pro-inflammatory interleukins (IL-6 and IL-8) and anti-inflammatory interleukins (IL-10) were released during major colorectal surgery. There was no significant difference between TIVA and inhalational anaesthesia regarding complement activation and cytokine release. Major colorectal surgery leads to activation of the complement cascade and the release of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. There are no significant differences between total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) with propofol and remifentanil and inhalational anaesthesia with sevoflurane and fentanyl regarding complement activation and the release of pro- and anti-inflammatory interleukins.